Version 0.2.0 from FTP
[asterisk/asterisk.git] / README.variables
1 GENERAL ENCHANCEMENTS TO EXTENSION LOGIC : 
2
3 QUOTING: 
4
5 exten => s,5,BackGround,blabla
6
7 The parameter (blabla) can be quoted ("blabla"). In this case, a 
8 comma does not terminate the field. 
9
10 Also, characters special to variable substitution, expression evaluation, etc
11 (see below), can be quoted. For example, to literally use a $ on the 
12 string "$1231", quote it with a preceeding \. Special characters that must
13 be quoted to be used, are [ ] $ " \. (to write \ itself, use \\). 
14
15 VARIABLES: 
16
17 Parameter strings can include variables. Variable names are arbitrary strings. 
18 They are stored in the respective channel structure. 
19
20 To set a variable to a particular value, do : 
21
22 ;exten => 1,2,SetVar,varname=value
23
24 You can substitute the value of a variable everywhere using ${variablename}.
25 For example, to stringwise append $lala to $blabla and store result in $koko, 
26 do: 
27
28 ;exten => 1,2,SetVar,koko=${blabla}${lala}
29
30 There are also the following special variables: 
31
32 ${CALLERID}     Caller ID
33 ${EXTEN}        Current extension
34 ${CONTEXT}      Current context
35 ${PRIORITY}     Current priority
36
37 There are two reference modes - reference by value and reference by name. 
38 To refer to a variable with its name (as an argument to a function that 
39 requires a variable), just write the name. To refer to the variable's value, 
40 enclose it inside ${}. For example, SetVar takes as the first argument 
41 (before the =) a variable name, so: 
42
43 ;exten => 1,2,SetVar,koko=lala
44 ;exten => 1,3,SetVar,${koko}=blabla
45
46 stores to the variable "koko" the value "lala" and to variable "lala" the 
47 value "blabla". 
48
49 In fact, everything contained ${here} is just replaced with the value of 
50 the variable "here". 
51
52 EXPRESSIONS: 
53
54 Everything contained inside a bracket pair prefixed by a $ (like $[this]) is 
55 considered as an expression and it is evaluated. Evaluation works similar to 
56 (but is done on a later stage than) variable substitution: the expression 
57 (including the square brackets) is replaced by the result of the expression 
58 evaluation. The arguments and operands of the expression MUST BE separated 
59 with spaces (take care NOT to leave ANY spaces between opening and closing 
60 square brackets and the first and last arguments). 
61
62 For example, after the sequence: 
63
64 exten => 1,1,SetVar,"lala=$[1 + 2]";
65 exten => 1,2,SetVar,"koko=$[2 * ${lala}]";
66
67 the value of variable koko is "6".
68
69 Operators are listed below in order of increasing precedence.  Operators
70 with equal precedence are grouped within { } symbols.
71
72      expr1 | expr2
73              Return the evaluation of expr1 if it is neither an empty string
74              nor zero; otherwise, returns the evaluation of expr2.
75
76      expr1 & expr2
77              Return the evaluation of expr1 if neither expression evaluates to
78              an empty string or zero; otherwise, returns zero.
79
80      expr1 {=, >, >=, <, <=, !=} expr2
81              Return the results of integer comparison if both arguments are
82              integers; otherwise, returns the results of string comparison
83              using the locale-specific collation sequence.  The result of each
84              comparison is 1 if the specified relation is true, or 0 if the
85              relation is false.
86
87      expr1 {+, -} expr2
88              Return the results of addition or subtraction of integer-valued
89              arguments.
90
91      expr1 {*, /, %} expr2
92              Return the results of multiplication, integer division, or
93              remainder of integer-valued arguments.
94
95      expr1 : expr2
96              The `:' operator matches expr1 against expr2, which must be a
97              regular expression.  The regular expression is anchored to the
98              beginning of  the string with an implicit `^'.
99
100              If the match succeeds and the pattern contains at least one regu-
101              lar expression subexpression `\(...\)', the string correspond-
102              ing to `\1' is returned; otherwise the matching operator
103              returns the number of characters matched.  If the match fails and
104              the pattern contains a regular expression subexpression the null
105              string is returned; otherwise 0.
106
107 Parentheses are used for grouping in the usual manner.
108
109 The parser must be parsed with bison (bison is REQUIRED - yacc cannot 
110 produce pure parsers, which are reentrant) 
111
112 CONDITIONALS
113
114 There is one conditional operator - the conditional goto : 
115
116 ;exten => 1,2,gotoif,condition?label1:label2
117
118 If condition is true go to label1, else go to label2. Labels are interpreted
119 exactly as in the normal goto command.
120
121 "condition" is just a string. If the string is empty or "0", the condition
122 is considered to be false, if it's anything else, the condition is true. 
123 This is designed to be used together with the expression syntax described 
124 above, eg : 
125
126 exten => 1,2,gotoif,$[${CALLERID} = 123456]?2|1:3|1
127
128
129 Example of use : 
130
131 exten => s,2,SetVar,"vara=1"
132 exten => s,3,SetVar,"varb=$[${vara} + 2]"
133 exten => s,4,SetVar,"varc=$[${varb} * 2]"
134 exten => s,5,GotoIf,"$[${varc} = 6]?99|1:s|6";
135