A lot of doxygen updates
[asterisk/asterisk.git] / include / asterisk / astobj2.h
1 /*
2  * astobj2 - replacement containers for asterisk data structures.
3  *
4  * Copyright (C) 2006 Marta Carbone, Luigi Rizzo - Univ. di Pisa, Italy
5  *
6  * See http://www.asterisk.org for more information about
7  * the Asterisk project. Please do not directly contact
8  * any of the maintainers of this project for assistance;
9  * the project provides a web site, mailing lists and IRC
10  * channels for your use.
11  *
12  * This program is free software, distributed under the terms of
13  * the GNU General Public License Version 2. See the LICENSE file
14  * at the top of the source tree.
15  */
16
17 #ifndef _ASTERISK_ASTOBJ2_H
18 #define _ASTERISK_ASTOBJ2_H
19
20 /*! \file 
21  * \ref AstObj2
22  *
23  * \page AstObj2 Object Model implementing objects and containers.
24
25 This module implements an abstraction for objects (with locks and
26 reference counts), and containers for these user-defined objects,
27 also supporting locking, reference counting and callbacks.
28
29 The internal implementation of objects and containers is opaque to the user,
30 so we can use different data structures as needs arise.
31
32 \section AstObj2_UsageObjects USAGE - OBJECTS
33
34 An ao2 object is a block of memory that the user code can access,
35 and for which the system keeps track (with a bit of help from the
36 programmer) of the number of references around.  When an object has
37 no more references (refcount == 0), it is destroyed, by first
38 invoking whatever 'destructor' function the programmer specifies
39 (it can be NULL if none is necessary), and then freeing the memory.
40 This way objects can be shared without worrying who is in charge
41 of freeing them.
42 As an additional feature, ao2 objects are associated to individual
43 locks.
44
45 Creating an object requires the size of the object and
46 and a pointer to the destructor function:
47  
48     struct foo *o;
49  
50     o = ao2_alloc(sizeof(struct foo), my_destructor_fn);
51
52 The value returned points to the user-visible portion of the objects
53 (user-data), but is also used as an identifier for all object-related
54 operations such as refcount and lock manipulations.
55
56 On return from ao2_alloc():
57
58  - the object has a refcount = 1;
59  - the memory for the object is allocated dynamically and zeroed;
60  - we cannot realloc() the object itself;
61  - we cannot call free(o) to dispose of the object. Rather, we
62    tell the system that we do not need the reference anymore:
63
64     ao2_ref(o, -1)
65
66   causing the destructor to be called (and then memory freed) when
67   the refcount goes to 0. This is also available as ao2_unref(o),
68   and returns NULL as a convenience, so you can do things like
69
70         o = ao2_unref(o);
71
72   and clean the original pointer to prevent errors.
73
74 - ao2_ref(o, +1) can be used to modify the refcount on the
75   object in case we want to pass it around.
76
77 - ao2_lock(obj), ao2_unlock(obj), ao2_trylock(obj) can be used
78   to manipulate the lock associated with the object.
79
80
81 \section AstObj2_UsageContainers USAGE - CONTAINERS
82
83 An ao2 container is an abstract data structure where we can store
84 ao2 objects, search them (hopefully in an efficient way), and iterate
85 or apply a callback function to them. A container is just an ao2 object
86 itself.
87
88 A container must first be allocated, specifying the initial
89 parameters. At the moment, this is done as follows:
90
91     <b>Sample Usage:</b>
92     \code
93
94     struct ao2_container *c;
95
96     c = ao2_container_alloc(MAX_BUCKETS, my_hash_fn, my_cmp_fn);
97     \endcode
98
99 where
100
101 - MAX_BUCKETS is the number of buckets in the hash table,
102 - my_hash_fn() is the (user-supplied) function that returns a
103   hash key for the object (further reduced modulo MAX_BUCKETS
104   by the container's code);
105 - my_cmp_fn() is the default comparison function used when doing
106   searches on the container,
107
108 A container knows little or nothing about the objects it stores,
109 other than the fact that they have been created by ao2_alloc().
110 All knowledge of the (user-defined) internals of the objects
111 is left to the (user-supplied) functions passed as arguments
112 to ao2_container_alloc().
113
114 If we want to insert an object in a container, we should
115 initialize its fields -- especially, those used by my_hash_fn() --
116 to compute the bucket to use.
117 Once done, we can link an object to a container with
118
119     ao2_link(c, o);
120
121 The function returns NULL in case of errors (and the object
122 is not inserted in the container). Other values mean success
123 (we are not supposed to use the value as a pointer to anything).
124
125 \note While an object o is in a container, we expect that
126 my_hash_fn(o) will always return the same value. The function
127 does not lock the object to be computed, so modifications of
128 those fields that affect the computation of the hash should
129 be done by extracting the object from the container, and
130 reinserting it after the change (this is not terribly expensive).
131
132 \note A container with a single buckets is effectively a linked
133 list. However there is no ordering among elements.
134
135 - \ref AstObj2_Containers
136 - \ref astobj2.h All documentation for functions and data structures
137
138  */
139
140 /*! \brief
141  * Typedef for an object destructor. This is called just before freeing
142  * the memory for the object. It is passed a pointer to the user-defined
143  * data of the object.
144  */
145 typedef void (*ao2_destructor_fn)(void *);
146
147
148 /*! \brief
149  * Allocate and initialize an object.
150  * 
151  * \param data_size The sizeof() of the user-defined structure.
152  * \param destructor_fn The destructor function (can be NULL)
153  * \return A pointer to user-data. 
154  *
155  * Allocates a struct astobj2 with sufficient space for the
156  * user-defined structure.
157  * \note
158  * - storage is zeroed; XXX maybe we want a flag to enable/disable this.
159  * - the refcount of the object just created is 1
160  * - the returned pointer cannot be free()'d or realloc()'ed;
161  *   rather, we just call ao2_ref(o, -1);
162  */
163 void *ao2_alloc(const size_t data_size, ao2_destructor_fn destructor_fn);
164
165 /*! \brief
166  * Reference/unreference an object and return the old refcount.
167  *
168  * \param o A pointer to the object
169  * \param delta Value to add to the reference counter.
170  * \return The value of the reference counter before the operation.
171  *
172  * Increase/decrease the reference counter according
173  * the value of delta.
174  *
175  * If the refcount goes to zero, the object is destroyed.
176  *
177  * \note The object must not be locked by the caller of this function, as
178  *       it is invalid to try to unlock it after releasing the reference.
179  *
180  * \note if we know the pointer to an object, it is because we
181  * have a reference count to it, so the only case when the object
182  * can go away is when we release our reference, and it is
183  * the last one in existence.
184  */
185 int ao2_ref(void *o, int delta);
186
187 /*! \brief
188  * Lock an object.
189  * 
190  * \param a A pointer to the object we want lock.
191  * \return 0 on success, other values on error.
192  */
193 int ao2_lock(void *a);
194
195 /*! \brief
196  * Unlock an object.
197  * 
198  * \param a A pointer to the object we want unlock.
199  * \return 0 on success, other values on error.
200  */
201 int ao2_unlock(void *a);
202
203 /*! 
204  *
205  \page AstObj2_Containers AstObj2 Containers
206
207 Containers are data structures meant to store several objects,
208 and perform various operations on them.
209 Internally, objects are stored in lists, hash tables or other
210 data structures depending on the needs.
211
212 \note NOTA BENE: at the moment the only container we support is the
213         hash table and its degenerate form, the list.
214
215 Operations on container include:
216
217   -  c = \b ao2_container_alloc(size, cmp_fn, hash_fn)
218         allocate a container with desired size and default compare
219         and hash function
220
221   -  \b ao2_find(c, arg, flags)
222         returns zero or more element matching a given criteria
223         (specified as arg). Flags indicate how many results we
224         want (only one or all matching entries), and whether we
225         should unlink the object from the container.
226
227   -  \b ao2_callback(c, flags, fn, arg)
228         apply fn(obj, arg) to all objects in the container.
229         Similar to find. fn() can tell when to stop, and
230         do anything with the object including unlinking it.
231         Note that the entire operation is run with the container
232         locked, so noone else can change its content while we work on it.
233         However, we pay this with the fact that doing
234         anything blocking in the callback keeps the container
235         blocked.
236         The mechanism is very flexible because the callback function fn()
237         can do basically anything e.g. counting, deleting records, etc.
238         possibly using arg to store the results.
239    
240   -  \b iterate on a container
241         this is done with the following sequence
242
243 \code
244
245             struct ao2_container *c = ... // our container
246             struct ao2_iterator i;
247             void *o;
248
249             i = ao2_iterator_init(c, flags);
250      
251             while ( (o = ao2_iterator_next(&i)) ) {
252                 ... do something on o ...
253                 ao2_ref(o, -1);
254             }
255 \endcode
256
257         The difference with the callback is that the control
258         on how to iterate is left to us.
259
260     - \b ao2_ref(c, -1)
261         dropping a reference to a container destroys it, very simple!
262  
263 Containers are ao2 objects themselves, and this is why their
264 implementation is simple too.
265
266 Before declaring containers, we need to declare the types of the
267 arguments passed to the constructor - in turn, this requires
268 to define callback and hash functions and their arguments.
269
270 - \ref AstObj2
271 - \ref astobj2.h
272  */
273
274 /*! \brief
275  * Type of a generic callback function
276  * \param obj  pointer to the (user-defined part) of an object.
277  * \param arg callback argument from ao2_callback()
278  * \param flags flags from ao2_callback()
279  *
280  * The return values are a combination of enum _cb_results.
281  * Callback functions are used to search or manipulate objects in a container,
282  */
283 typedef int (ao2_callback_fn)(void *obj, void *arg, int flags);
284
285 /*! \brief a very common callback is one that matches by address. */
286 ao2_callback_fn ao2_match_by_addr;
287
288 /*! \brief
289  * A callback function will return a combination of CMP_MATCH and CMP_STOP.
290  * The latter will terminate the search in a container.
291  */
292 enum _cb_results {
293         CMP_MATCH       = 0x1,  /*!< the object matches the request */
294         CMP_STOP        = 0x2,  /*!< stop the search now */
295 };
296
297 /*! \brief
298  * Flags passed to ao2_callback() and ao2_hash_fn() to modify its behaviour.
299  */
300 enum search_flags {
301         /*! Unlink the object for which the callback function
302          *  returned CMP_MATCH . This is the only way to extract
303          *  objects from a container. */
304         OBJ_UNLINK       = (1 << 0),
305         /*! On match, don't return the object hence do not increase
306          *  its refcount. */
307         OBJ_NODATA       = (1 << 1),
308         /*! Don't stop at the first match in ao2_callback()
309          *  \note This is not fully implemented. */
310         OBJ_MULTIPLE = (1 << 2),
311         /*! obj is an object of the same type as the one being searched for,
312          *  so use the object's hash function for optimized searching.
313          *  The search function is unaffected (i.e. use the one passed as
314          *  argument, or match_by_addr if none specified). */
315         OBJ_POINTER      = (1 << 3),
316 };
317
318 /*!
319  * Type of a generic function to generate a hash value from an object.
320  * flags is ignored at the moment. Eventually, it will include the
321  * value of OBJ_POINTER passed to ao2_callback().
322  */
323 typedef int (ao2_hash_fn)(const void *obj, const int flags);
324
325 /*! \name Object Containers 
326  * Here start declarations of containers.
327  */
328 /*@{ */
329 struct ao2_container;
330
331 /*! \brief
332  * Allocate and initialize a container 
333  * with the desired number of buckets.
334  * 
335  * We allocate space for a struct astobj_container, struct container
336  * and the buckets[] array.
337  *
338  * \param n_buckets Number of buckets for hash
339  * \param hash_fn Pointer to a function computing a hash value.
340  * \param cmp_fn Pointer to a function comparating key-value 
341  *                      with a string. (can be NULL)
342  * \return A pointer to a struct container.
343  *
344  * destructor is set implicitly.
345  */
346 struct ao2_container *ao2_container_alloc(const uint n_buckets,
347                 ao2_hash_fn *hash_fn, ao2_callback_fn *cmp_fn);
348
349 /*! \brief
350  * Returns the number of elements in a container.
351  */
352 int ao2_container_count(struct ao2_container *c);
353 /*@} */
354
355 /*! \name Object Management
356  * Here we have functions to manage objects.
357  *
358  * We can use the functions below on any kind of 
359  * object defined by the user.
360  */
361 /*@{ */
362
363 /*!
364  * \brief Add an object to a container.
365  *
366  * \param c the container to operate on.
367  * \param newobj the object to be added.
368  *
369  * \retval NULL on errors
370  * \retval newobj on success.
371  *
372  * This function inserts an object in a container according its key.
373  *
374  * \note Remember to set the key before calling this function.
375  *
376  * \note This function automatically increases the reference count to account
377  *       for the reference that the container now holds to the object.
378  */
379 void *ao2_link(struct ao2_container *c, void *newobj);
380
381 /*!
382  * \brief Remove an object from the container
383  *
384  * \arg c the container
385  * \arg obj the object to unlink
386  *
387  * \retval NULL, always
388  *
389  * \note The object requested to be unlinked must be valid.  However, if it turns
390  *       out that it is not in the container, this function is still safe to
391  *       be called.
392  *
393  * \note If the object gets unlinked from the container, the container's
394  *       reference to the object will be automatically released.  
395  */
396 void *ao2_unlink(struct ao2_container *c, void *obj);
397
398 /*! \brief Used as return value if the flag OBJ_MULTIPLE is set */
399 struct ao2_list {
400         struct ao2_list *next;
401         void *obj;      /* pointer to the user portion of the object */
402 };
403 /*@} */
404
405 /*! \brief
406  * ao2_callback() is a generic function that applies cb_fn() to all objects
407  * in a container, as described below.
408  * 
409  * \param c A pointer to the container to operate on.
410  * \param arg passed to the callback.
411  * \param flags A set of flags specifying the operation to perform,
412         partially used by the container code, but also passed to
413         the callback.
414  * \return      A pointer to the object found/marked, 
415  *              a pointer to a list of objects matching comparison function,
416  *              NULL if not found.
417  *
418  * If the function returns any objects, their refcount is incremented,
419  * and the caller is in charge of decrementing them once done.
420  * Also, in case of multiple values returned, the list used
421  * to store the objects must be freed by the caller.
422  *
423  * Typically, ao2_callback() is used for two purposes:
424  * - to perform some action (including removal from the container) on one
425  *   or more objects; in this case, cb_fn() can modify the object itself,
426  *   and to perform deletion should set CMP_MATCH on the matching objects,
427  *   and have OBJ_UNLINK set in flags.
428  * - to look for a specific object in a container; in this case, cb_fn()
429  *   should not modify the object, but just return a combination of
430  *   CMP_MATCH and CMP_STOP on the desired object.
431  * Other usages are also possible, of course.
432
433  * This function searches through a container and performs operations
434  * on objects according on flags passed.
435  * XXX describe better
436  * The comparison is done calling the compare function set implicitly. 
437  * The p pointer can be a pointer to an object or to a key, 
438  * we can say this looking at flags value.
439  * If p points to an object we will search for the object pointed
440  * by this value, otherwise we serch for a key value.
441  * If the key is not uniq we only find the first matching valued.
442  * If we use the OBJ_MARK flags, we mark all the objects matching 
443  * the condition.
444  *
445  * The use of flags argument is the follow:
446  *
447  *      OBJ_UNLINK              unlinks the object found
448  *      OBJ_NODATA              on match, do return an object
449  *                              Callbacks use OBJ_NODATA as a default
450  *                              functions such as find() do
451  *      OBJ_MULTIPLE            return multiple matches
452  *                              Default for _find() is no.
453  *                              to a key (not yet supported)
454  *      OBJ_POINTER             the pointer is an object pointer
455  *
456  * In case we return a list, the callee must take care to destroy 
457  * that list when no longer used.
458  *
459  * \note When the returned object is no longer in use, ao2_ref() should
460  * be used to free the additional reference possibly created by this function.
461  */
462 void *ao2_callback(struct ao2_container *c,
463         enum search_flags flags,
464         ao2_callback_fn *cb_fn, void *arg);
465
466 /*! ao2_find() is a short hand for ao2_callback(c, flags, c->cmp_fn, arg)
467  * XXX possibly change order of arguments ?
468  */
469 void *ao2_find(struct ao2_container *c, void *arg, enum search_flags flags);
470
471 /*! \brief
472  *
473  *
474  * When we need to walk through a container, we use
475  * ao2_iterator to keep track of the current position.
476  * 
477  * Because the navigation is typically done without holding the
478  * lock on the container across the loop,
479  * objects can be inserted or deleted or moved
480  * while we work. As a consequence, there is no guarantee that
481  * the we manage to touch all the elements on the list, or it
482  * is possible that we touch the same object multiple times.
483  * However, within the current hash table container, the following is true:
484  *  - It is not possible to miss an object in the container while iterating
485  *    unless it gets added after the iteration begins and is added to a bucket
486  *    that is before the one the current object is in.  In this case, even if
487  *    you locked the container around the entire iteration loop, you still would
488  *    not see this object, because it would still be waiting on the container
489  *    lock so that it can be added.
490  *  - It would be extremely rare to see an object twice.  The only way this can
491  *    happen is if an object got unlinked from the container and added again 
492  *    during the same iteration.  Furthermore, when the object gets added back,
493  *    it has to be in the current or later bucket for it to be seen again.
494  *
495  * An iterator must be first initialized with ao2_iterator_init(),
496  * then we can use o = ao2_iterator_next() to move from one
497  * element to the next. Remember that the object returned by
498  * ao2_iterator_next() has its refcount incremented,
499  * and the reference must be explicitly released when done with it.
500  *
501  * Example:
502  *
503  *  \code
504  *
505  *  struct ao2_container *c = ... // the container we want to iterate on
506  *  struct ao2_iterator i;
507  *  struct my_obj *o;
508  *
509  *  i = ao2_iterator_init(c, flags);
510  *
511  *  while ( (o = ao2_iterator_next(&i)) ) {
512  *     ... do something on o ...
513  *     ao2_ref(o, -1);
514  *  }
515  *
516  *  \endcode
517  *
518  */
519
520 /*! \brief 
521  * The Astobj2 iterator
522  *
523  * \note You are not supposed to know the internals of an iterator!
524  * We would like the iterator to be opaque, unfortunately
525  * its size needs to be known if we want to store it around
526  * without too much trouble.
527  * Anyways...
528  * The iterator has a pointer to the container, and a flags
529  * field specifying various things e.g. whether the container
530  * should be locked or not while navigating on it.
531  * The iterator "points" to the current object, which is identified
532  * by three values:
533  *
534  * - a bucket number;
535  * - the object_id, which is also the container version number
536  *   when the object was inserted. This identifies the object
537  *   univoquely, however reaching the desired object requires
538  *   scanning a list.
539  * - a pointer, and a container version when we saved the pointer.
540  *   If the container has not changed its version number, then we
541  *   can safely follow the pointer to reach the object in constant time.
542  *
543  * Details are in the implementation of ao2_iterator_next()
544  * A freshly-initialized iterator has bucket=0, version = 0.
545  */
546 struct ao2_iterator {
547         /*! the container */
548         struct ao2_container *c;
549         /*! operation flags */
550         int flags;
551 #define F_AO2I_DONTLOCK 1       /*!< don't lock when iterating */
552         /*! current bucket */
553         int bucket;
554         /*! container version */
555         uint c_version;
556         /*! pointer to the current object */
557         void *obj;
558         /*! container version when the object was created */
559         uint version;
560 };
561
562 struct ao2_iterator ao2_iterator_init(struct ao2_container *c, int flags);
563
564 void *ao2_iterator_next(struct ao2_iterator *a);
565
566 /* extra functions */
567 void ao2_bt(void);      /* backtrace */
568 #endif /* _ASTERISK_ASTOBJ2_H */