Many doc directory improvements, including:
authorRussell Bryant <russell@russellbryant.com>
Fri, 12 Oct 2007 15:50:29 +0000 (15:50 +0000)
committerRussell Bryant <russell@russellbryant.com>
Fri, 12 Oct 2007 15:50:29 +0000 (15:50 +0000)
- Added development section (backtrace.tex)
- Correct filesystem path formating
- Replace all "|" argument separator to ","
- Endless count of spaces at the end of line
- Using astlisting to make listings do not take so much place
- Take back ASTRISKVERSION on first page
- Make localchannel.tex readable by inserting extra end of lines

(closes issue #10962)
Reported by: IgorG
Patches:
      texdoc-85177-1.patch uploaded by IgorG (license 20)

git-svn-id: https://origsvn.digium.com/svn/asterisk/trunk@85519 65c4cc65-6c06-0410-ace0-fbb531ad65f3

16 files changed:
doc/tex/ael.tex
doc/tex/app-sms.tex
doc/tex/asterisk.tex
doc/tex/cdrdriver.tex
doc/tex/channelvariables.tex
doc/tex/cliprompt.tex
doc/tex/dundi.tex
doc/tex/enum.tex
doc/tex/extensions.tex
doc/tex/ices.tex
doc/tex/localchannel.tex
doc/tex/manager.tex
doc/tex/odbcstorage.tex
doc/tex/privacy.tex
doc/tex/queues-with-callback-members.tex
doc/tex/sla.tex

index 87e224b..76f3b38 100644 (file)
@@ -1,9 +1,9 @@
 \section{Introduction}
 
-AEL is a specialized language intended purely for 
+AEL is a specialized language intended purely for
 describing Asterisk dial plans.
 
-The current version was written by Steve Murphy, and is a rewrite of 
+The current version was written by Steve Murphy, and is a rewrite of
 the original version.
 
 This new version further extends AEL, and
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@ AEL is really the merger of 4 different 'languages', or syntaxes:
 
     \item The second syntax is the Expression Syntax, which is normally
      handled by Asterisk extension engine, as expressions enclosed in
-     \$[...]. The right hand side of assignments are wrapped in \$[ ... ] 
+     \$[...]. The right hand side of assignments are wrapped in \$[ ... ]
      by AEL, and so are the if and while expressions, among others.
 
     \item The third syntax is the Variable Reference Syntax, the stuff
@@ -139,16 +139,16 @@ Right at this moment, the following commands are available, but do
 nothing:
 
 Enable AEL contexts debug
-   *CLI> ael debug contexts 
+   *CLI> ael debug contexts
 
 Enable AEL macros debug
-   *CLI> ael debug macros 
+   *CLI> ael debug macros
 
 Enable AEL read debug
    *CLI> ael debug read
 
 Enable AEL tokens debug
-   *CLI> ael debug tokens 
+   *CLI> ael debug tokens
 
 Disable AEL debug messages
    *CLI> ael no debug
@@ -201,7 +201,7 @@ be included on a single line. Whatever you think is best!
 You can just as easily say,
 
 \begin{verbatim}
-if(${x}=1) { NoOp(hello!); goto s|3; } else { NoOp(Goodbye!); goto s|12; }
+if(${x}=1) { NoOp(hello!); goto s,3; } else { NoOp(Goodbye!); goto s,12; }
 \end{verbatim}
 
 as you can say:
@@ -210,12 +210,12 @@ as you can say:
 if(${x}=1)
 {
        NoOp(hello!);
-   goto s|3;
+   goto s,3;
 }
 else
 {
        NoOp(Goodbye!);
-       goto s|12;
+       goto s,12;
 }
 \end{verbatim}
 
@@ -224,10 +224,10 @@ or:
 \begin{verbatim}
 if(${x}=1) {
        NoOp(hello!);
-   goto s|3;
+   goto s,3;
 } else {
        NoOp(Goodbye!);
-       goto s|12;
+       goto s,12;
 }
 \end{verbatim}
 
@@ -235,9 +235,9 @@ or:
 
 \begin{verbatim}
 if (${x}=1) {
-       NoOp(hello!); goto s|3;
+       NoOp(hello!); goto s,3;
 } else {
-       NoOp(Goodbye!); goto s|12;
+       NoOp(Goodbye!); goto s,12;
 }
 \end{verbatim}
 
@@ -274,12 +274,12 @@ The following are keywords in the AEL language:
     \item while
     \item case
     \item pattern
-    \item default   NOTE: the "default" keyword can be used as a context name, 
+    \item default   NOTE: the "default" keyword can be used as a context name,
                       for those who would like to do so.
     \item catch
     \item switches
     \item eswitches
-    \item includes 
+    \item includes
 \end{itemize}
 
 
@@ -288,15 +288,15 @@ The following are keywords in the AEL language:
 AEL first parses the extensions.ael file into a memory structure representing the file.
 The entire file is represented by a tree of "pval" structures linked together.
 
-This tree is then handed to the semantic check routine. 
+This tree is then handed to the semantic check routine.
 
-Then the tree is handed to the compiler. 
+Then the tree is handed to the compiler.
 
 After that, it is freed from memory.
 
 A program could be written that could build a tree of pval structures, and
 a pretty printing function is provided, that would dump the data to a file,
-or the tree could be handed to the compiler to merge the data into the 
+or the tree could be handed to the compiler to merge the data into the
 asterisk dialplan. The modularity of the design offers several opportunities
 for developers to simplify apps to generate dialplan data.
 
@@ -307,6 +307,7 @@ for developers to simplify apps to generate dialplan data.
 
 First, some basic objects
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 ------------------------
 <word>    a lexical token consisting of characters matching this pattern: [-a-zA-Z0-9"_/.\<\>\*\+!$#\[\]][-a-zA-Z0-9"_/.!\*\+\<\>\{\}$#\[\]]*
@@ -490,9 +491,8 @@ First, some basic objects
 
 <includes> :== 'includes' '{' <includeslist> '}'
        | 'includes' '{' '}'
-
 \end{verbatim}
-
+\end{astlisting}
 
 \section{AEL Example USAGE}
 
@@ -582,7 +582,7 @@ CID matching is done as with the extensions.conf file. Follow the extension
 name/number with a slash (/) and the number to match against the Caller ID:
 
 \begin{verbatim}
-context zoombo 
+context zoombo
 {
   819/7079953345 => { NoOp(hello, 3345); }
 }
@@ -701,14 +701,14 @@ context foo {
 }
 \end{verbatim}
 
-NOTE: AEL wraps the right hand side of an assignment with \$[ ] to allow 
-expressions to be used If this is unwanted, you can protect the right hand 
-side from being wrapped by using the Set() application. 
-Read the README.variables about the requirements and behavior 
+NOTE: AEL wraps the right hand side of an assignment with \$[ ] to allow
+expressions to be used If this is unwanted, you can protect the right hand
+side from being wrapped by using the Set() application.
+Read the README.variables about the requirements and behavior
 of \$[ ] expressions.
 
-NOTE: These things are wrapped up in a \$[ ] expression: The while() test; 
-the if() test; the middle expression in the for( x; y; z) statement 
+NOTE: These things are wrapped up in a \$[ ] expression: The while() test;
+the if() test; the middle expression in the for( x; y; z) statement
 (the y expression); Assignments - the right hand side, so a = b -> Set(a=\$[b])
 
 Writing to a dialplan function is treated the same as writing to a variable.
@@ -719,7 +719,7 @@ context blah {
          CALLERID(name)=ChickenMan;
          NoOp(My name is ${CALLERID(name)} !);
     }
-} 
+}
 \end{verbatim}
 
 You can declare variables in Macros, as so:
@@ -739,7 +739,7 @@ arguments and associated ARG1, ARG2, etc variables. Sorry.
 
 In trunk (1.6 and higher), we have made all arguments local variables to
 a macro call. They will not affect channel variables of the same name.
-This includes the ARG1, ARG2, etc variables. 
+This includes the ARG1, ARG2, etc variables.
 
 Users can declare their own local variables by using the keyword 'local'
 before setting them to a value;
@@ -753,7 +753,7 @@ Macro myroutine(firstarg, secondarg)
 \end{verbatim}
 
 In the above example, Myvar, firstarg, and secondarg are all local variables,
-and will not be visible to the calling code, be it an extension, or another Macro. 
+and will not be visible to the calling code, be it an extension, or another Macro.
 
 If you need to make a local variable within the Set() application, you can do it this way:
 
@@ -812,7 +812,7 @@ context conditional {
          }
          else
               Voicemail(${EXTEN}|u);
-         ifTime (14:00-25:00|sat-sun|*|*) 
+         ifTime (14:00-25:00|sat-sun|*|*)
               Voicemail(${EXTEN}|b);
          else
          {
@@ -858,7 +858,7 @@ context conditional {
 \end{verbatim}
 
 NOTE: The conditional expression in if() statements (the
-      "\${DIALSTATUS}" = "BUSY" above) is wrapped by the compiler in 
+      "\${DIALSTATUS}" = "BUSY" above) is wrapped by the compiler in
       \$[] for evaluation.
 
 NOTE: Neither the switch nor case values are wrapped in \$[ ]; they can
@@ -926,7 +926,7 @@ begin:
 
 context gotoexample2 {
      s =>  {
-   end: 
+   end:
            goto gotoexample|s|begin;   // go to label in different context
      }
 }
@@ -962,7 +962,7 @@ begin:
 
 context gotoexample2 {
      s =>  {
-   end: 
+   end:
            jump s@gotoexample;   // go to label in different context
      }
 }
@@ -980,7 +980,7 @@ NOTE: goto labels follow the same requirements as the Goto()
 NOTE  AEL introduces the special label "1", which is the beginning
       context number for most extensions.
 
-NOTE: A NEW addition to AEL: you can now use ',' instead of '|' to 
+NOTE: A NEW addition to AEL: you can now use ',' instead of '|' to
       separate the items in the target address. You can't have a mix,
       though, of '|' and ',' in the target. It's either one, or the other.
 
@@ -1099,7 +1099,7 @@ tree, and makes several checks:
           o the times have to be in range of 0 to 24 hours.
           o The weekdays have to match the internal list, if they are provided;
           o the day of the month, if provided, must be in range of 1 to 31;
-          o the month name or names have to match those in the internal list. 
+          o the month name or names have to match those in the internal list.
     \item (0.5) If an expression is wrapped in \$[ ... ], and the compiler
       will wrap it again, a warning is issued.
     \item (0.5) If an expression had operators (you know,
@@ -1107,7 +1107,7 @@ tree, and makes several checks:
       issued. Maybe someone forgot to wrap a variable name?
     \item (0.12) check for duplicate context names.
     \item (0.12) check for abstract contexts that are not included by any context.
-    \item (0.13) Issue a warning if a label is a numeric value. 
+    \item (0.13) Issue a warning if a label is a numeric value.
 \end{itemize}
 
 There are a subset of checks that have been removed until the proposed
@@ -1249,18 +1249,18 @@ available through AEL, via:
       commands
 
     \item Functions: Functions were implemented inside \${ .. } variable
-      references, and supply many useful capabilities. 
+      references, and supply many useful capabilities.
 
     \item Expressions: An expression evaluation engine handles items
       wrapped inside \$[...]. This includes some string manipulation
-      facilities, arithmetic expressions, etc. 
+      facilities, arithmetic expressions, etc.
 
     \item Application Gateway Interface: Asterisk can fork external
       processes that communicate via pipe. AGI applications can be
       written in any language. Very powerful applications can be added
-      this way. 
+      this way.
 
     \item Variables: Channels of communication have variables associated
       with them, and asterisk provides some global variables. These can be
-      manipulated and/or consulted by the above mechanisms. 
+      manipulated and/or consulted by the above mechanisms.
 \end{itemize}
index 0c30904..a11de4a 100644 (file)
    can be encoded in a text message such as ring tones, and small
    graphic, etc. Text messaging is being used for voting and
    competitions, and also SPAM...
-   
+
    Sending a message involves the mobile phone contacting a message
    centre (SMSC) and passing the message to it. The message centre then
    contacts the destination mobile to deliver the message. The SMSC is
    responsible for storing the message and trying to send it until the
    destination mobile is available, or a timeout.
-   
+
    Landline SMS works in basically the same way. You would normally have
    a suitable text capable landline phone, or a separate texting box such
    as a Magic Messenger on your phone line. This sends a message to a
 \section{extensions.conf}
 
    The following contexts are recommended.
+
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 ; Mobile Terminated, RX. This is used when an incoming call from the SMS arrive
 s, with the queue (called number and sub address) in ${EXTEN}
-; Running an app after receipt of the text allows the app to find all messages 
+; Running an app after receipt of the text allows the app to find all messages
 in the queue and handle them, e.g. email them.
-; The app may be something like   smsq --process=somecommand --queue=${EXTEN}  
+; The app may be something like   smsq --process=somecommand --queue=${EXTEN}
 to run a command for each received message
 ; See below for usage
 [smsmtrx]
-exten = _X.,1, SMS(${EXTEN}|a)
+exten = _X.,1, SMS(${EXTEN},a)
 exten = _X.,2,System("someapptohandleincomingsms ${EXTEN}")
 exten = _X.,3,Hangup
-; Mobile originated, RX. This is receiving a message from a device, e.g. 
+; Mobile originated, RX. This is receiving a message from a device, e.g.
 ; a Magic Messenger on a sip extension
-; Running an app after receipt of the text allows the app to find all messages 
+; Running an app after receipt of the text allows the app to find all messages
 ; in the queue and handle then, e.g. sending them to the public SMSC
-; The app may be something like   smsq --process=somecommand --queue=${EXTEN}  
+; The app may be something like   smsq --process=somecommand --queue=${EXTEN}
 ; to run a command for each received message
 ; See below for example usage
 [smsmorx]
-exten = _X.,1, SMS(${EXTEN}|sa)
+exten = _X.,1, SMS(${EXTEN},sa)
 exten = _X.,2,System("someapptohandlelocalsms ${EXTEN}")
 exten = _X.,3,Hangup
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
    smsmtrx is normally accessed by an incoming call from the SMSC. In the
    UK this call is from a CLI of 080058752X0 where X is the sub address.
@@ -318,7 +321,7 @@ exten = _1709400[0-8],1,Goto(smsmorx,${CALLERID(num)}-{EXTEN:7:1},1)
    error. Any trailing arguments are processed as follows:-
 
 \begin{itemize}
-    
+
      \item If the message is mobile originating and no destination address
        has been specified, then the first argument is assumed to be a
        destination address
@@ -405,7 +408,7 @@ exten = _1709400[0-8],1,Goto(smsmorx,${CALLERID(num)}-{EXTEN:7:1},1)
    Within this directory are sub directories mtrx, mttx, morx, motx which
    hold the received messages and the messages ready to send. Also,
    /var/log/asterisk/sms is a log file of all messages handled.
-   
+
    The file name in each queue directory starts with the queue parameter
    to SMS which is normally the CLI used for an outgoing message or the
    called number on an incoming message, and may have -X (X being sub
index d84028b..ca0a0dc 100644 (file)
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@
 
 
 \author{Asterisk Development Team \\ Asterisk.org}
-\title{Asterisk Reference Information \\ Version SVN-trunk-r72921M}
+\title{Asterisk Reference Information \\ Version ASTERISKVERSION}
 
 \begin{document}
 \maketitle
@@ -132,6 +132,12 @@ reference purposes.
   \section{Queue Logs}
   \input{queuelog.tex}
 
+\chapter{Development}
+  \section{Backtrace}
+  \input{backtrace.tex}
+
+
+
 % This is a list of files not yet integrated into this document:
 %
 %Misc
@@ -143,7 +149,6 @@ reference purposes.
 %--------------
 %See http://www.asterisk.org/developers for more information
 %
-%backtrace.txt      How to produce a backtrace when Asterisk crashes
 %callfiles.txt      Asterisk callfiles using instruction
 %CODING-GUIDELINES  Guidelines for developers
 %externalivr.txt    Documentation of the protocol used in externalivr()
index 9a90426..35c39df 100644 (file)
@@ -249,26 +249,29 @@ SQLite version 2 is supported in cdr\_sqlite.
 \subsection{Steps to follow in order to have RADIUS support}
 
 \subsubsection{Installation of the Radiusclient library}
-   Installation:
-\begin{verbatim}       
-       Download the sources from:
-               
-       http://developer.berlios.de/projects/radiusclient-ng/
+
+       Download the sources from       
+       \url{http://developer.berlios.de/projects/radiusclient-ng/}
                
-       Untar the source tarball.
-               root@localhost:/usr/local/src# tar xvfz radiusclient-ng-0.5.2.tar.gz
-
-       Compile and install the library.
-               root@localhost:/usr/local/src# cd radiusclient-ng-0.5.2
-               root@localhost:/usr/local/src/radiusclient-ng-0.5.2# ./configure
-               root@localhost:/usr/local/src/radiusclient-ng-0.5.2# make
-               root@localhost:/usr/local/src/radiusclient-ng-0.5.2# make install
+       Untar the source tarball:
+
+\begin{verbatim}
+       root@localhost:/usr/local/src# tar xvfz radiusclient-ng-0.5.2.tar.gz
+\end{verbatim}
+
+       Compile and install the library:
+
+\begin{verbatim}
+       root@localhost:/usr/local/src# cd radiusclient-ng-0.5.2
+       root@localhost:/usr/local/src/radiusclient-ng-0.5.2# ./configure
+       root@localhost:/usr/local/src/radiusclient-ng-0.5.2# make
+       root@localhost:/usr/local/src/radiusclient-ng-0.5.2# make install
 \end{verbatim}
 
 \subsubsection{Configuration of the Radiusclient library}
        
        By default all the configuration files of the radiusclient library will
-       be in /usr/local/etc/radiusclient-ng directory.
+       be in \path{/usr/local/etc/radiusclient-ng} directory.
                
        File "radiusclient.conf"
                Open the file and find lines containing the following:
@@ -280,11 +283,12 @@ SQLite version 2 is supported in cdr\_sqlite.
        running on the same host as your Asterisk PBX.
 
                        acctserver      localhost
+
        This is the hostname or IP address of the RADIUS server used for 
        accounting. You will have to change this unless the server is running
        on the same host as your Asterisk PBX.
 
-       File "servers" 
+       \textbf{File "servers"} 
                
        RADIUS protocol uses simple access control mechanism based on shared
        secrets that allows RADIUS servers to limit access from RADIUS clients.
@@ -294,25 +298,23 @@ SQLite version 2 is supported in cdr\_sqlite.
 
        You need to configure a shared secret for each server you have 
        configured in radiusclient.conf file in the previous step. The shared 
-       secrets are stored in /usr/local/etc/radiusclient-ng/servers file.
+       secrets are stored in \path{/usr/local/etc/radiusclient-ng/servers} file.
 
        Each line contains hostname of a RADIUS server and shared secret 
        used in communication with that server. The two values are separated 
        by white spaces. Configure shared secrets for every RADIUS server you 
        are going to use.
 
-       File "dictionary"
+       \textbf{File "dictionary"}
                        
        Asterisk uses some attributes that are not included in the 
        dictionary of radiusclient library, therefore it is necessary to add 
        them. A file called dictionary.digium (kept in the contrib dir)
        was created to list all new attributes used by Asterisk. 
        Add to the end of the main dictionary file
-       /usr/local/etc/radiusclient-ng/dictionary
-       the line:
-\begin{verbatim}
+       \path{/usr/local/etc/radiusclient-ng/dictionary} the line:
+
                \$INCLUDE /path/to/dictionary.digium
-\end{verbatim}
 
 \subsubsection{Install FreeRADIUS Server (Version 1.1.1)}
  
@@ -341,7 +343,7 @@ SQLite version 2 is supported in cdr\_sqlite.
 
        File "clients.conf"
                        
-       File /usr/local/etc/raddb/clients.conf contains description of 
+       File \path{/usr/local/etc/raddb/clients.conf} contains description of 
        RADIUS clients that are allowed to use the server. For each of the 
        clients you need to specify its hostname or IP address and also a 
        shared secret. The shared secret must be the same string you configured
@@ -363,15 +365,15 @@ SQLite version 2 is supported in cdr\_sqlite.
                
        File "dictionary"
                
-       Note : as of version 1.1.2, the dictionary.digium file ships with FreeRADIUS. 
+       Note: as of version 1.1.2, the dictionary.digium file ships with FreeRADIUS. 
        The following procedure brings the dictionary.digium file to previous versions 
        of FreeRADIUS.
        
-       File /usr/local/etc/raddb/dictionary contains the dictionary of 
+       File \path{/usr/local/etc/raddb/dictionary} contains the dictionary of 
        FreeRADIUS server. You have to add the same dictionary file 
        (dictionary.digium), which you added to the dictionary of radiusclient-ng
        library. You can include it into the main file, adding the following line at the
-       end of file '/usr/local/etc/raddb/dictionary':
+       end of file \path{/usr/local/etc/raddb/dictionary}:
                
        \$INCLUDE /path/to/dictionary.digium
 
@@ -388,17 +390,16 @@ SQLite version 2 is supported in cdr\_sqlite.
         library has been detected on your system.
        
        By default FreeRADIUS server will log all accounting requests into 
-       /usr/local/var/log/radius/radacct directory in form of plain text files. 
+       \path{/usr/local/var/log/radius/radacct} directory in form of plain text files. 
        The server will create one file for each hostname in the directory. The 
        following example shows how the log files look like. 
 
-       Asterisk now generates Call Detail Records. See /include/asterisk/cdr.h
+       Asterisk now generates Call Detail Records. See \path{/include/asterisk/cdr.h}
        for all the fields which are recorded. By default, records in comma 
-       separated values will be created in /var/log/asterisk/cdr-csv. 
-
-       The configuration file for cdr\_radius.so module is :
+       separated values will be created in \path{/var/log/asterisk/cdr-csv}. 
 
-        /etc/asterisk/cdr.conf 
+       The configuration file for cdr\_radius.so module is \path{/etc/asterisk/cdr.conf}
+        
        This is where you can set CDR related parameters as well as the path to
        the radiusclient-ng library configuration file.
 
@@ -423,7 +424,7 @@ SQLite version 2 is supported in cdr\_sqlite.
   "Asterisk-Bill-Sec",                 The duration that a call was up after other 
                                 end answered which will be <= to duration  
                                 "end time" minus "answer time" 
-  "Asterisk-Disposition",      ANSWERED, NO ANSWER, BUSY 
+  "Asterisk-Disposition",        ANSWERED, NO ANSWER, BUSY 
   "Asterisk-AMA-Flags",        DOCUMENTATION, BILL, IGNORE etc, specified on 
                                 a per channel basis like accountcode. 
   "Asterisk-Unique-ID",         Unique call identifier 
index 5fc4f93..1dfcfc2 100644 (file)
@@ -4,8 +4,8 @@ There are two levels of parameter evaluation done in the Asterisk
 dial plan in extensions.conf.
 \begin{enumerate}
 \item The first, and most frequently used, is the substitution of variable
-  references with their values. 
-\item Then there are the evaluations of expressions done in \$[ .. ]. 
+  references with their values.
+\item Then there are the evaluations of expressions done in \$[ .. ].
   This will be discussed below.
 \end{enumerate}
 Asterisk has user-defined variables and standard variables set
@@ -16,69 +16,69 @@ listed at the end of this document.
 \begin{verbatim}
 exten => s,5,BackGround,blabla
 \end{verbatim}
-The parameter (blabla) can be quoted ("blabla"). In this case, a 
+The parameter (blabla) can be quoted ("blabla"). In this case, a
 comma does not terminate the field. However, the double quotes
 will be passed down to the Background command, in this example.
 
 Also, characters special to variable substitution, expression evaluation, etc
-(see below), can be quoted. For example, to literally use a \$ on the 
+(see below), can be quoted. For example, to literally use a \$ on the
 string "\$1231", quote it with a preceding \textbackslash. Special characters that must
-be quoted to be used, are [ ] \$ " \textbackslash. (to write \textbackslash itself, use \textbackslash). 
+be quoted to be used, are [ ] \$ " \textbackslash. (to write \textbackslash itself, use \textbackslash).
 
 These Double quotes and escapes are evaluated at the level of the
-asterisk config file parser. 
+asterisk config file parser.
 
 Double quotes can also be used inside expressions, as discussed below.
 
 \section{Variables}
 
-Parameter strings can include variables. Variable names are arbitrary strings. 
-They are stored in the respective channel structure. 
+Parameter strings can include variables. Variable names are arbitrary strings.
+They are stored in the respective channel structure.
 
-To set a variable to a particular value, do: 
+To set a variable to a particular value, do:
 \begin{verbatim}
     exten => 1,2,Set(varname=value)
 \end{verbatim}
 You can substitute the value of a variable everywhere using \${variablename}.
-For example, to stringwise append \$lala to \$blabla and store result in \$koko, 
-do: 
+For example, to stringwise append \$lala to \$blabla and store result in \$koko,
+do:
 \begin{verbatim}
    exten => 1,2,Set(koko=${blabla}${lala})
 \end{verbatim}
 
-There are two reference modes - reference by value and reference by name. 
-To refer to a variable with its name (as an argument to a function that 
-requires a variable), just write the name. To refer to the variable's value, 
-enclose it inside \${}. For example, Set takes as the first argument 
-(before the =) a variable name, so: 
+There are two reference modes - reference by value and reference by name.
+To refer to a variable with its name (as an argument to a function that
+requires a variable), just write the name. To refer to the variable's value,
+enclose it inside \${}. For example, Set takes as the first argument
+(before the =) a variable name, so:
 \begin{verbatim}
   exten => 1,2,Set(koko=lala)
   exten => 1,3,Set(${koko}=blabla)
 \end{verbatim}
-stores to the variable "koko" the value "lala" and to variable "lala" the 
-value "blabla". 
+stores to the variable "koko" the value "lala" and to variable "lala" the
+value "blabla".
 
-In fact, everything contained \${here} is just replaced with the value of 
-the variable "here". 
+In fact, everything contained \${here} is just replaced with the value of
+the variable "here".
 
 \section{Variable Inheritance}
 
-Variable names which are prefixed by "\_" will be inherited to channels 
-that are created in the process of servicing the original channel in 
-which the variable was set.  When the inheritance takes place, the 
-prefix will be removed in the channel inheriting the variable.  If the 
-name is prefixed by "\_\_" in the channel, then the variable is 
+Variable names which are prefixed by "\_" will be inherited to channels
+that are created in the process of servicing the original channel in
+which the variable was set.  When the inheritance takes place, the
+prefix will be removed in the channel inheriting the variable.  If the
+name is prefixed by "\_\_" in the channel, then the variable is
 inherited and the "\_\_" will remain intact in the new channel.
 
-In the dialplan, all references to these variables refer to the same 
-variable, regardless of having a prefix or not.  Note that setting any 
-version of the variable removes any other version of the variable, 
+In the dialplan, all references to these variables refer to the same
+variable, regardless of having a prefix or not.  Note that setting any
+version of the variable removes any other version of the variable,
 regardless of prefix.
 
 \subsection{Example}
 \begin{verbatim}
-Set(__FOO=bar) ; Sets an inherited version of "FOO" variable 
-Set(FOO=bar)   ; Removes the inherited version and sets a local 
+Set(__FOO=bar) ; Sets an inherited version of "FOO" variable
+Set(FOO=bar)   ; Removes the inherited version and sets a local
                ; variable.
 
 However,
@@ -101,11 +101,11 @@ skip from the beginning of the string to the variable name.
   exten => _9X.,1,Set(number=${EXTEN:1})
 \end{verbatim}
 Assuming we've dialed 918005551234, the value saved to the 'number' variable
-would be 18005551234. This is useful in situations when we require users to 
-dial a number to access an outside line, but do not wish to pass the first 
+would be 18005551234. This is useful in situations when we require users to
+dial a number to access an outside line, but do not wish to pass the first
 digit.
 
-If you use a negative offset number, Asterisk starts counting from the end 
+If you use a negative offset number, Asterisk starts counting from the end
 of the string and then selects everything after the new position. The following
 example will save the numbers 1234 to the 'number' variable, still assuming
 we've dialed 918005551234.
@@ -137,13 +137,13 @@ from the end of the string.
   exten => _XXXX#,1,Set(pin=${EXTEN:0:-1})
 \end{verbatim}
 
-\section{Expressions} 
+\section{Expressions}
 
-Everything contained inside a bracket pair prefixed by a \$ (like \$[this]) is 
-considered as an expression and it is evaluated. Evaluation works similar to 
-(but is done on a later stage than) variable substitution: the expression 
-(including the square brackets) is replaced by the result of the expression 
-evaluation. 
+Everything contained inside a bracket pair prefixed by a \$ (like \$[this]) is
+considered as an expression and it is evaluated. Evaluation works similar to
+(but is done on a later stage than) variable substitution: the expression
+(including the square brackets) is replaced by the result of the expression
+evaluation.
 
 For example, after the sequence:
 \begin{verbatim}
@@ -170,7 +170,7 @@ The double quotes will be counted as part of that lexical token.
 As an example:
 
 \begin{verbatim}
-exten => s,6,GotoIf($[ "${CALLERID(name)}" : "Privacy Manager" ]?callerid-liar|s|1:s|7)
+exten => s,6,GotoIf($[ "${CALLERID(name)}" : "Privacy Manager" ]?callerid-liar,s,1:s,7)
 \end{verbatim}
 
 The variable CALLERID(name) could evaluate to "DELOREAN MOTORS" (with a space)
@@ -189,7 +189,7 @@ DELOREAN MOTORS : Privacy Manager
 \end{verbatim}
 
 and will result in syntax errors, because token DELOREAN is immediately
-followed by token MOTORS and the expression parser will not know how to 
+followed by token MOTORS and the expression parser will not know how to
 evaluate this expression, because it does not match its grammar.
 
 \subsection{Operators}
@@ -246,8 +246,8 @@ with equal precedence are grouped within { } symbols.
        regular expression.  The regular expression is anchored to the
        beginning of  the string with an implicit `\^'.
 
-       If the match succeeds and the pattern contains at least one regular 
-       expression subexpression `\(...\)', the string corresponing 
+       If the match succeeds and the pattern contains at least one regular
+       expression subexpression `\(...\)', the string corresponing
        to `\textbackslash1' is returned; otherwise the matching operator
        returns the number of characters matched.  If the match fails and
        the pattern contains a regular expression subexpression the null
@@ -288,13 +288,13 @@ or C derived languages.
 
 In 1.6 and above, we shifted the \$[...] expressions to be calculated
 via floating point numbers instead of integers. We use 'long double' numbers
-when possible, which provide around 16 digits of precision with 12 byte numbers. 
+when possible, which provide around 16 digits of precision with 12 byte numbers.
 
-To specify a floating point constant, the number has to have this format: D.D, where D is 
+To specify a floating point constant, the number has to have this format: D.D, where D is
 a string of base 10 digits. So, you can say 0.10, but you can't say .10 or 20.-- we hope
 this is not an excessive restriction!
 
-Floating point numbers are turned into strings via the '%g'/'%Lg' format of the printf
+Floating point numbers are turned into strings via the '\%g'/'\%Lg' format of the printf
 function set. This allows numbers to still 'look' like integers to those counting
 on integer behavior. If you were counting on 1/4 evaluating to 0, you need to now say
 TRUNC(1/4). For a list of all the truncation/rounding capabilities, see the next section.
@@ -309,7 +309,7 @@ added to the core of the Expr2 parser. Indeed, dialplan functions can be called
 \$[..] expressions without the \$\{...\} operators. The only trouble might be in the fact that
 the arguments to these functions must be specified with a comma. If you try to call
 the MATH function, for example, and try to say 3 + MATH(7*8), the expression parser will
-evaluate 7*8 for you into 56, and the MATH function will most likely complain that its 
+evaluate 7*8 for you into 56, and the MATH function will most likely complain that its
 input doesn't make any sense.
 
 We also provide access to most of the floating point functions in the C library. (but not all of them).
@@ -323,7 +323,7 @@ surround function calls in \$[...] expressions with \$\{...\}. Don't jump to con
 though! -- you still need to wrap variable names in curly braces!
 
 \begin{enumerate}
-\item COS(x) x is in radians. Results vary from -1 to 1. 
+\item COS(x) x is in radians. Results vary from -1 to 1.
 \item SIN(x) x is in radians. Results vary from -1 to 1.
 \item TAN(x) x is in radians.
 \item ACOS(x) x should be a value between -1 and 1.
@@ -431,7 +431,6 @@ TRUNC(3.5)
 
 TRUNC(-3.5)
    returns -3.
-
 \end{verbatim}
 \end{astlisting}
 
@@ -450,7 +449,7 @@ case.
 
 \subsection{Conditionals}
 
-There is one conditional application - the conditional goto : 
+There is one conditional application - the conditional goto :
 
 \begin{verbatim}
   exten => 1,2,GotoIf(condition?label1:label2)
@@ -460,21 +459,21 @@ If condition is true go to label1, else go to label2. Labels are interpreted
 exactly as in the normal goto command.
 
 "condition" is just a string. If the string is empty or "0", the condition
-is considered to be false, if it's anything else, the condition is true. 
-This is designed to be used together with the expression syntax described 
-above, eg : 
+is considered to be false, if it's anything else, the condition is true.
+This is designed to be used together with the expression syntax described
+above, eg :
 
 \begin{verbatim}
-  exten => 1,2,GotoIf($[${CALLERID(all)} = 123456]?2|1:3|1)
+  exten => 1,2,GotoIf($[${CALLERID(all)} = 123456]?2,1:3,1)
 \end{verbatim}
 
-Example of use : 
+Example of use :
 
 \begin{verbatim}
 exten => s,2,Set(vara=1)
 exten => s,3,Set(varb=$[${vara} + 2])
 exten => s,4,Set(varc=$[${varb} * 2])
-exten => s,5,GotoIf($[${varc} = 6]?99|1:s|6)
+exten => s,5,GotoIf($[${varc} = 6]?99,1:s,6)
 \end{verbatim}
 
 \subsection{Parse Errors}
@@ -483,16 +482,20 @@ Syntax errors are now output with 3 lines.
 
 If the extensions.conf file contains a line like:
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
-exten => s,6,GotoIf($[ "${CALLERID(num)}"  = "3071234567" & &  "${CALLERID(name)}" : "Privacy Manager" ]?callerid-liar|s|1:s|7)
+exten => s,6,GotoIf($[ "${CALLERID(num)}"  = "3071234567" & &  "${CALLERID(name)}" : "Privacy Manager" ]?callerid-liar,s,1:s,7)
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 You may see an error in /var/log/asterisk/messages like this:
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 Jul 15 21:27:49 WARNING[1251240752]: ast_yyerror(): syntax error: parse error, unexpected TOK_AND, expecting TOK_MINUS or TOK_LP or TOKEN; Input:
-"3072312154"  = "3071234567" & & "Steves Extension" : "Privacy Manager" 
-                               ^
+"3072312154"  = "3071234567" & & "Steves Extension" : "Privacy Manager"
+               ^
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 The log line tells you that a syntax error was encountered. It now
 also tells you (in grand standard bison format) that it hit an "AND"
@@ -506,12 +509,12 @@ marked with the "\^" character.
 \subsection{NULL Strings}
 Testing to see if a string is null can be done in one of two different ways:
 \begin{verbatim}
-  exten => _XX.,1,GotoIf($["${calledid}" != ""]?3) 
+  exten => _XX.,1,GotoIf($["${calledid}" != ""]?3)
 
-  exten => _XX.,1,GotoIf($[foo${calledid} != foo]?3) 
+  exten => _XX.,1,GotoIf($[foo${calledid} != foo]?3)
 \end{verbatim}
 
-The second example above is the way suggested by the WIKI. It will 
+The second example above is the way suggested by the WIKI. It will
 work as long as there are no spaces in the evaluated value.
 
 The first way should work in all cases, and indeed, might now
@@ -529,7 +532,7 @@ Pascal, APL, assembler, etc.
 \subsection{Incompatabilities}
 
 The asterisk expression parser has undergone some evolution. It is hoped
-that the changes will be viewed as positive. 
+that the changes will be viewed as positive.
 
 The "original" expression parser had a simple, hand-written scanner,
 and a simple bison grammar. This was upgraded to a more involved bison
@@ -545,7 +548,7 @@ allow it.
 
 If you have not touched your extensions.conf files in a year or so, the
 above upgrades may cause you some heartburn in certain circumstances, as
-several changes have been made, and these will affect asterisk's behavior on 
+several changes have been made, and these will affect asterisk's behavior on
 legacy extension.conf constructs.  The changes have been engineered
 to minimize these conflicts, but there are bound to be problems.
 
@@ -558,21 +561,21 @@ of possible concern with "legacy" extension.conf files:
    to the value '2', but '1+1' would evaluate to the string '1+1'. If this
    behavior was depended on, then the expression evaluation will break. '1+1'
    will now evaluate to '2', and something is not going to work right.
-   To keep such strings from being evaluated, simply wrap them in double 
+   To keep such strings from being evaluated, simply wrap them in double
    quotes: '  "1+1" '
 
 \item The colon operator. In versions previous to double quoting, the
-   colon operator takes the right hand string, and using it as a 
+   colon operator takes the right hand string, and using it as a
    regex pattern, looks for it in the left hand string. It is given
-   an implicit \^ operator at the beginning, meaning the pattern 
-   will match only at the beginning of the left hand string. 
+   an implicit \^ operator at the beginning, meaning the pattern
+   will match only at the beginning of the left hand string.
    If the pattern or the matching string had double quotes around
    them, these could get in the way of the pattern match. Now,
-   the wrapping double quotes are stripped from both the pattern 
+   the wrapping double quotes are stripped from both the pattern
    and the left hand string before applying the pattern. This
    was done because it recognized that the new way of
    scanning the expression doesn't use spaces to separate tokens,
-   and the average regex expression is full of operators that 
+   and the average regex expression is full of operators that
    the scanner will recognize as expression operators. Thus, unless
    the pattern is wrapped in double quotes, there will be trouble.
    For instance,      \${VAR1} : (Who|What*)+
@@ -601,7 +604,7 @@ of possible concern with "legacy" extension.conf files:
 
 \item  Added the conditional operator  'expr1 ? true\_expr :: false\_expr'
     First, all 3 exprs are evaluated, and if expr1 is false, the 'false\_expr'
-    is returned as the result. See above for details. 
+    is returned as the result. See above for details.
 
 \item  Unary operators '-' and '!' were made right associative.
 \end{enumerate}
@@ -682,7 +685,7 @@ available in each application's help text. All these variables
 are in UPPER CASE only.
 
 Variables marked with a * are builtin functions and can't be set,
-only read in the dialplan.  Writes to such variables are silently 
+only read in the dialplan.  Writes to such variables are silently
 ignored.
 
 \begin{verbatim}
@@ -701,7 +704,7 @@ ${CALLINGTNS}          * Transit Network Selector (PRI channels)
 ${CALLINGTON}          * Caller Type of Number (PRI channels)
 ${CHANNEL}             * Current channel name
 ${CONTEXT}             * Current context
-${DATETIME}            * Current date time in the format: DDMMYYYY-HH:MM:SS 
+${DATETIME}            * Current date time in the format: DDMMYYYY-HH:MM:SS
                          (Deprecated; use ${STRFTIME(${EPOCH},,%d%m%Y-%H:%M:%S)})
 ${DB_RESULT}             Result value of DB_EXISTS() dial plan function
 ${EPOCH}               * Current unix style epoch
@@ -719,7 +722,7 @@ ${LANGUAGE}            * Current language (Deprecated; use ${LANGUAGE()})
 ${LEN(VAR)}            * String length of VAR (integer)
 ${PRIORITY}            * Current priority in the dialplan
 ${PRIREDIRECTREASON}     Reason for redirect on PRI, if a call was directed
-${TIMESTAMP}           * Current date time in the format: YYYYMMDD-HHMMSS 
+${TIMESTAMP}           * Current date time in the format: YYYYMMDD-HHMMSS
                          (Deprecated; use ${STRFTIME(${EPOCH},,%Y%m%d-%H%M%S)})
 ${TRANSFER_CONTEXT}      Context for transferred calls
 ${FORWARD_CONTEXT}       Context for forwarded calls
@@ -791,7 +794,7 @@ ${VPB_GETDTMF}            chan_vpb
 
 \subsection{The MeetMe Conference Bridge}
 \begin{verbatim}
-${MEETME_RECORDINGFILE}     Name of file for recording a conference with 
+${MEETME_RECORDINGFILE}     Name of file for recording a conference with
                             the "r" option
 ${MEETME_RECORDINGFORMAT}   Format of file to be recorded
 ${MEETME_EXIT_CONTEXT}      Context for exit out of meetme meeting
@@ -826,14 +829,14 @@ ${DUNDDEST}       * The Destination of the result from a call to DUNDiLookup()
 
 \subsection{chan\_zap}
 \begin{verbatim}
-${ANI2}               * The ANI2 Code provided by the network on the incoming call. 
+${ANI2}               * The ANI2 Code provided by the network on the incoming call.
                         (ie, Code 29 identifies call as a Prison/Inmate Call)
 ${CALLTYPE}           * Type of call (Speech, Digital, etc)
 ${CALLEDTON}          * Type of number for incoming PRI extension
-                        i.e. 0=unknown, 1=international, 2=domestic, 3=net_specific, 
-                        4=subscriber, 6=abbreviated, 7=reserved 
+                        i.e. 0=unknown, 1=international, 2=domestic, 3=net_specific,
+                        4=subscriber, 6=abbreviated, 7=reserved
 ${CALLINGSUBADDR}     * Called PRI Subaddress
-${FAXEXTEN}           * The extension called before being redirected to "fax" 
+${FAXEXTEN}           * The extension called before being redirected to "fax"
 ${PRIREDIRECTREASON}  * Reason for redirect, if a call was directed
 ${SMDI_VM_TYPE}       * When an call is received with an SMDI message, the 'type'
                         of message 'b' or 'u'
@@ -845,7 +848,7 @@ ${SIPCALLID}         * SIP Call-ID: header verbatim (for logging or CDR matching
 ${SIPDOMAIN}         * SIP destination domain of an inbound call (if appropriate)
 ${SIPUSERAGENT}      * SIP user agent (deprecated)
 ${SIPURI}            * SIP uri
-${SIP_CODEC}           Set the SIP codec for a call  
+${SIP_CODEC}           Set the SIP codec for a call
 ${SIP_URI_OPTIONS}   * additional options to add to the URI for an outgoing call
 ${RTPAUDIOQOS}         RTCP QoS report for the audio of this call
 ${RTPVIDEOQOS}         RTCP QoS report for the video of this call
@@ -872,7 +875,7 @@ ${DIALEDPEERNUMBER}   * Dialed peer number
 ${DIALEDTIME}         * Time for the call (seconds)
 ${ANSWEREDTIME}       * Time from dial to answer (seconds)
 ${DIALSTATUS}         * Status of the call, one of:
-                        (CHANUNAVAIL | CONGESTION | BUSY | NOANSWER 
+                        (CHANUNAVAIL | CONGESTION | BUSY | NOANSWER
                         | ANSWER | CANCEL | DONTCALL | TORTURE)
 ${DYNAMIC_FEATURES}   * The list of features (from the [applicationmap] section of
                         features.conf) to activate during the call, with feature
@@ -888,7 +891,7 @@ ${OUTBOUND_GROUP}          Default groups for peer channels (as in SetGroup)
 
 \subsection{The chanisavail() application}
 \begin{verbatim}
-${AVAILCHAN}          * the name of the available channel if one was found  
+${AVAILCHAN}          * the name of the available channel if one was found
 ${AVAILORIGCHAN}      * the canonical channel name that was used to create the channel
 ${AVAILSTATUS}        * Status of requested channel
 \end{verbatim}
@@ -912,7 +915,7 @@ ${SPYGROUP}           * A ':' (colon) separated list of group names.
 ${OSPINHANDLE}          OSP handle of in_bound call
 ${OSPINTIMELIMIT}       Duration limit for in_bound call
 ${OSPOUTHANDLE}         OSP handle of out_bound call
-${OSPTECH}              OSP technology 
+${OSPTECH}              OSP technology
 ${OSPDEST}              OSP destination
 ${OSPCALLING}           OSP calling number
 ${OSPOUTTOKEN}          OSP token to use for out_bound call
index 8599431..6e7cf91 100644 (file)
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ the current value by Asterisk:
 %Cn[;n]        Change terminal foreground (and optional background) color to specified
 \end{verbatim}
 
-A full list of colors may be found in include/asterisk/term.h
+A full list of colors may be found in \path{include/asterisk/term.h}
 
 On Linux systems, you may also use:
 
index 327efa7..c61ddb0 100644 (file)
@@ -29,12 +29,12 @@ a DUNDi query from the dialplan, see how many results there are, and access
 each one.  Here is some example usage:
 
 \begin{verbatim}
-exten => 1,1,Set(ID=${DUNDIQUERY(1|dundi_test|b)})
-exten => 1,n,Set(NUM=${DUNDIRESULT(${ID}|getnum)})
+exten => 1,1,Set(ID=${DUNDIQUERY(1,dundi_test,b)})
+exten => 1,n,Set(NUM=${DUNDIRESULT(${ID},getnum)})
 exten => 1,n,NoOp(There are ${NUM} results)
 exten => 1,n,Set(X=1) 
 exten => 1,n,While($[${X} <= ${NUM}])
-exten => 1,n,NoOp(Result ${X} is ${DUNDIRESULT(${ID}|${X})}) 
+exten => 1,n,NoOp(Result ${X} is ${DUNDIRESULT(${ID},${X})}) 
 exten => 1,n,Set(X=$[${X} + 1])
 exten => 1,n,EndWhile
 \end{verbatim}
index 56c710a..9a3384d 100644 (file)
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ function is then up to the administrator to implement in a way that
 best suits their environment.
 
 \begin{verbatim}
-Function: ENUMLOOKUP(number[|Method-type[|options[|record#[|zone-suffix]]]])
+Function: ENUMLOOKUP(number[,Method-type[,options[,record#[,zone-suffix]]]])
 \end{verbatim}
 
   Performs an ENUM tree lookup on the specified number, method type, and
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ Function: ENUMLOOKUP(number[|Method-type[|options[|record#[|zone-suffix]]]])
    \item post-parsed NAPTR of one method (URI) type
    \item count of elements of one method (URI) type
    \item count of all method types
-   \item full URI of method at a particular point in the list of all possible methods 
+   \item full URI of method at a particular point in the list of all possible methods
 \end{enumerate}
 
 \subsection{Arguments}
@@ -48,7 +48,7 @@ Function: ENUMLOOKUP(number[|Method-type[|options[|record#[|zone-suffix]]]])
   \end{itemize}
 
   \item service\_type
-  \begin{itemize} 
+  \begin{itemize}
      \item tel, sip, h323, iax2, mailto, ...[any other string],
      ALL. Default type is "sip".
      Special name of "ALL" will create a list of method types across
@@ -58,7 +58,7 @@ Function: ENUMLOOKUP(number[|Method-type[|options[|record#[|zone-suffix]]]])
      record (lowest value) in the list.  The service types are not
      hardcoded in Asterisk except for the default (sip) if no other
      service type specified; any method type string (IANA-approved or
-     not) may be used except for the string "ALL".  
+     not) may be used except for the string "ALL".
   \end{itemize}
 
   \item options
@@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ Function: ENUMLOOKUP(number[|Method-type[|options[|record#[|zone-suffix]]]])
     \end{itemize}
   \end{itemize}
 
-  \item record\# 
+  \item record\#
   \begin{itemize}
     \item which record to present if multiple answers are returned
     <integer> = The record in priority/order sequence based on the
@@ -103,17 +103,17 @@ and it is included as a more complex regexp example, though other
 simpler NAPTRs will work just as well.
 
 \begin{verbatim}
-0.2.0.1.1.6.5.1.0.3.1.loligo.com. 3600 IN NAPTR 10 100 "u" 
+0.2.0.1.1.6.5.1.0.3.1.loligo.com. 3600 IN NAPTR 10 100 "u"
      "E2U+tel" "!^\\+13015611020$!tel:+12125551212!" .
-0.2.0.1.1.6.5.1.0.3.1.loligo.com. 3600 IN NAPTR 21 100 "u" 
+0.2.0.1.1.6.5.1.0.3.1.loligo.com. 3600 IN NAPTR 21 100 "u"
      "E2U+tel" "!^\\+13015611020$!tel:+14155551212!" .
-0.2.0.1.1.6.5.1.0.3.1.loligo.com. 3600 IN NAPTR 25 100 "u" 
+0.2.0.1.1.6.5.1.0.3.1.loligo.com. 3600 IN NAPTR 25 100 "u"
      "E2U+sip" "!^\\+13015611020$!sip:2203@sip.fox-den.com!" .
-0.2.0.1.1.6.5.1.0.3.1.loligo.com. 3600 IN NAPTR 26 100 "u" 
+0.2.0.1.1.6.5.1.0.3.1.loligo.com. 3600 IN NAPTR 26 100 "u"
      "E2U+sip" "!^\\+13015611020$!sip:1234@sip-2.fox-den.com!" .
-0.2.0.1.1.6.5.1.0.3.1.loligo.com. 3600 IN NAPTR 30 100 "u" 
+0.2.0.1.1.6.5.1.0.3.1.loligo.com. 3600 IN NAPTR 30 100 "u"
      "E2U+sip" "!^\\+*([^\\*]*)!sip:\\1@sip-3.fox-den.com!" .
-0.2.0.1.1.6.5.1.0.3.1.loligo.com. 3600 IN NAPTR 55 100 "u" 
+0.2.0.1.1.6.5.1.0.3.1.loligo.com. 3600 IN NAPTR 55 100 "u"
      "E2U+mailto" "!^\\+13015611020$!mailto:jtodd@fox-den.com!" .
 \end{verbatim}
 
@@ -282,18 +282,18 @@ ENUMLOOKUP function calls.
 ; Look up the first SIP result and send the call there, otherwise
 ;  send the call out a PRI.  This is the most simple possible
 ;  ENUM example, but only uses the first SIP reply in the list of
-;  NAPTR(s). 
+;  NAPTR(s).
 ;
 exten => _011.,1,Set(enumresult=${ENUMLOOKUP(+${EXTEN:3})})
 exten => _011.,n,Dial(SIP/${enumresult})
 exten => _011.,n,Dial(Zap/g1/${EXTEN})
-; 
+;
 ; end example 1
 
 ; example 2
 ;
 ; Assumes North American international dialing (011) prefix.
-; Check to see if there are multiple SIP NAPTRs returned by 
+; Check to see if there are multiple SIP NAPTRs returned by
 ;  the lookup, and dial each in order.  If none work (or none
 ;  exist) then send the call out a PRI, group 1.
 ;
index 35d8454..cb79926 100644 (file)
@@ -15,10 +15,10 @@ pattern, "N", "X", and "Z" are interpreted as classes of digits.
 
 For each extension, several actions may be listed and must be given a unique
 priority. When each action completes, the call continues at the next priority
-(except for some modules which use explicitly GOTO's). 
+(except for some modules which use explicitly GOTO's).
 
 When each action completes, it generally moves to the next priority (except for
-some modules which use explicitly GOTO's. 
+some modules which use explicitly GOTO's.
 
 Extensions frequently have data they pass to the executing application
 (most frequently a string).  You can see the available dialplan applications
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ functions in your Asterisk, use the "show functions" command.
 
 \subsubsection{Example dialplan}
 
-The example dial plan, in the configs/extensions.conf.sample file
+The example dial plan, in the \path{configs/extensions.conf.sample} file
 is installed as extensions.conf if you run "make samples" after
 installation of Asterisk. This file includes many more instructions
 and examples than this file, so it's worthwhile to read it.
@@ -44,7 +44,7 @@ There are some extensions with important meanings:
   \begin{itemize}
     \item What to do when an extension context is entered (unless
           overridden by the low level channel interface)
-          This is used in macros, and some special cases. 
+          This is used in macros, and some special cases.
           "s" is not a generic catch-all wildcard extension.
   \end{itemize}
   \item i
@@ -76,7 +76,7 @@ There are some extensions with important meanings:
   \end{itemize}
 \end{itemize}
 
-And finally, the extension context "default" is used when either a) an 
+And finally, the extension context "default" is used when either a) an
 extension context is deleted while an extension is in use, or b) a specific
 starting extension handler has not been defined (unless overridden by the
 low level channel interface).
index 77267b5..39872be 100644 (file)
@@ -3,5 +3,5 @@ a caller stream right into an ice-cast stream as well as using chan\_local
 to place things like conferences, music on hold, etc. into the stream.
 
 You'll need to specify a config file for the ices encoder.  An example is
-included in contrib/asterisk-ices.xml.
+included in \path{contrib/asterisk-ices.xml}.
 
index 2a018e2..896f3f1 100644 (file)
@@ -1,25 +1,50 @@
 \subsection{Introduction}
 
-chan\_local is a pseudo-channel. Use of this channel simply loops calls back into the dialplan in a different context. Useful for recursive routing.
+chan\_local is a pseudo-channel. Use of this channel simply loops calls back 
+into the dialplan in a different context. Useful for recursive routing.
 
 \subsection{Syntax}
 \begin{verbatim}
  Local/extension@context[/n]
 \end{verbatim}
 
-Adding "/n" at the end of the string will make the Local channel not do a native transfer (the "n" stands for "n"o release) upon the remote end answering the line. This is an esoteric, but important feature if you expect the Local channel to handle calls exactly like a normal channel. If you do not have the "no release" feature set, then as soon as the destination (inside of the Local channel) answers the line, the variables and dial plan will revert back to that of the original call, and the Local channel will become a zombie and be removed from the active channels list. This is desirable in some circumstances, but can result in unexpected dialplan behavior if you are doing fancy things with variables in your call handling.
-
-There is another option that can be used with local channels, which is the "j" option.  The "j" option must be used with the "n" option to make sure that the local channel does not get optimized out of the call.  This option will enable a jitterbuffer on the local channel.  The jitterbuffer will be used to de-jitter audio that it receives from the channel that called the local channel.  This is especially in the case of putting chan\_local in between an incoming SIP call and Asterisk applications, so that the incoming audio will be de-jittered.
+Adding "/n" at the end of the string will make the Local channel not do a 
+native transfer (the "n" stands for "n"o release) upon the remote end answering 
+the line. This is an esoteric, but important feature if you expect the Local 
+channel to handle calls exactly like a normal channel. If you do not have the 
+"no release" feature set, then as soon as the destination (inside of the Local 
+channel) answers the line, the variables and dial plan will revert back to that 
+of the original call, and the Local channel will become a zombie and be removed 
+from the active channels list. This is desirable in some circumstances, but can 
+result in unexpected dialplan behavior if you are doing fancy things with 
+variables in your call handling.
+
+There is another option that can be used with local channels, which is the "j" 
+option.  The "j" option must be used with the "n" option to make sure that the 
+local channel does not get optimized out of the call.  This option will enable 
+a jitterbuffer on the local channel.  The jitterbuffer will be used to de-jitter 
+audio that it receives from the channel that called the local channel.  This is 
+especially in the case of putting chan\_local in between an incoming SIP call 
+and Asterisk applications, so that the incoming audio will be de-jittered.
 
 \subsection{Purpose}
 
-The Local channel construct can be used to establish dialing into any part of the dialplan.
+The Local channel construct can be used to establish dialing into any part of 
+the dialplan.
 
-Imagine you have a TE410P in your box. You want to do something for which you must use a Dial statement (for instance when dropping files in /var/spool/outgoing) but you do want to be able to use your dialplans least-cost-routes or other intelligent stuff. What you could do before we had chan\_local was create a cross-link between two ports of the TE410P and then Dial out one port and in the other. This way you could control where the call was going.
+Imagine you have a TE410P in your box. You want to do something for which you 
+must use a Dial statement (for instance when dropping files in 
+\path{/var/spool/outgoing}) but you do want to be able to use your dialplans 
+least-cost-routes or other intelligent stuff. What you could do before we had 
+chan\_local was create a cross-link between two ports of the TE410P and then 
+Dial out one port and in the other. This way you could control where the call 
+was going.
 
-Of course, this was a nasty hack, and to make it more sensible, chan\_local was built.
+Of course, this was a nasty hack, and to make it more sensible, chan\_local was 
+built.
 
-The "Local" channel driver allows you to convert an arbitrary extension into a channel. It is used in a variety of places, including agents, etc.
+The "Local" channel driver allows you to convert an arbitrary extension into a 
+channel. It is used in a variety of places, including agents, etc.
 
 This also allows us to hop to contexts like a GoSub routine; See examples below.
 
@@ -44,7 +69,10 @@ exten => _0.,1,Dial(Zap/g1/${EXTEN:1}) ; outgoing calls with 0+number
 
 \subsection{Caveats}
 
-If you use chan\_local from a call-file and you want to pass channel variables into your context, make sure you append the '/n', because otherwise chan\_local will 'optimize' itself out of the call-path, and the variables will get lost. i.e.
+If you use chan\_local from a call-file and you want to pass channel variables 
+into your context, make sure you append the '/n', because otherwise 
+chan\_local will 'optimize' itself out of the call-path, and the variables will 
+get lost. i.e.
 
 \begin{verbatim}
  Local/00531234567@pbx becomes Local/00531234567@pbx/n
index 5c88141..192587c 100644 (file)
@@ -61,43 +61,50 @@ You can get more information about a manager command
 with the "manager show command $<$command$>$" CLI command in Asterisk.
 
 \section{Examples}
-\begin{verbatim}
+
 Login - Log a user into the manager interface.
 
+\begin{verbatim}
    Action: Login
    Username: testuser
    Secret: testsecret
+\end{verbatim}
 
 Originate - Originate a call from a channel to an extension.
 
+\begin{verbatim}
    Action: Originate
    Channel: sip/12345
    Exten: 1234
    Context: default
+\end{verbatim}
 
 Originate - Originate a call from a channel to an extension without waiting
 for call to complete.
 
+\begin{verbatim}
    Action: Originate
    Channel: sip/12345
    Exten: 1234
    Context: default
    Async: yes
-
+\end{verbatim}
 
 Redirect with ExtraChannel:
+
   Attempted goal:
   Have a 'robot' program Redirect both ends of an already-connected call
   to a meetme room using the ExtraChannel feature through the management interface.
 
+\begin{verbatim}
   Action: Redirect
   Channel: Zap/1-1
   ExtraChannel: SIP/3064-7e00 (varies)
   Exten: 680
   Priority: 1
+\end{verbatim}
 
 Where 680 is an extension that sends you to a MeetMe room.
-\end{verbatim}
 
 There are a number of GUI tools that use the manager interface, please search
 the mailing list archives and the documentation page on the 
index 361c898..fed96e9 100644 (file)
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ table is as follows:
 +----------------+-------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
 \end{verbatim}
 
-The database name (from /etc/asterisk/res\_odbc.conf) is in the 
+The database name (from \path{/etc/asterisk/res_odbc.conf}) is in the 
 "odbcstorage" variable in the general section of voicemail.conf.
 
 You may modify the voicemessages table name by using 
index 93b60ba..25fc865 100644 (file)
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ I highly advise Zapateller for those seeking the nirvana of "privacy".
 \subsection{Next, Fight against the empty CALLERID!}
 
 A considerable percentage of the calls you don't want, come from
-sites that do not provide CallerID. 
+sites that do not provide CallerID.
 
 Null callerid's are a fact of life, and could be a friend with an
 unlisted number, or some charity looking for a handout. The
@@ -65,6 +65,8 @@ This will also immediately foil all autodialers that simply belch a
 message in your ear and hang up.
 
 \subsubsection{Example usage of Zapateller and PrivacyManager}
+
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 [homeline]
 exten => s,1,Answer
@@ -72,14 +74,15 @@ exten => s,2,SetVar,repeatcount=0
 exten => s,3,Zapateller,nocallerid
 exten => s,4,PrivacyManager
      ;; do this if they don't enter a number to Privacy Manager
-exten => s,105,Background(tt-allbusy)       
+exten => s,105,Background(tt-allbusy)
 exten => s,106,Background(tt-somethingwrong)
 exten => s,107,Background(tt-monkeysintro)
 exten => s,108,Background(tt-monkeys)
 exten => s,109,Background(tt-weasels)
 exten => s,110,Hangup
-exten => s,5,GotoIf($[ "${CALLERID(num)}"  = "7773334444" & "${CALLERID(name)}" : "Privacy Manager" ]?callerid-liar|s|1:s|7)
+exten => s,5,GotoIf($[ "${CALLERID(num)}"  = "7773334444" & "${CALLERID(name)}" : "Privacy Manager" ]?callerid-liar,s,1:s,7)
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 I suggest using Zapateller at the beginning of the context, before
 anything else, on incoming calls.This can be followed by the
@@ -97,7 +100,7 @@ other paths to my torture scripts, I wanted to have some fun.
 In nearly all cases now, the telemarketers/charity-seekers that
 usually get thru to my main intro, hang up. I guess they can see it's
 pointless, or the average telemarketer/charity-seeker is instructed
-not to enter options when encountering such systems. Don't know. 
+not to enter options when encountering such systems. Don't know.
 
 
 \subsection{Next: Torture Them!}
@@ -163,15 +166,11 @@ There are some variations, and these will be explained in due course.
 
 To use these options, set your Dial to something like:
 \begin{verbatim}
-exten => 3,3,Dial(Zap/5r3&Zap/6r3|35|tmPA(beep))
-
-or 
-
-exten => 3,3,Dial(Zap/5r3&Zap/6r3|35|tmP(something)A(beep))
-
-or 
-
-exten => 3,3,Dial(Zap/5r3&Zap/6r3|35|tmpA(beep))
+exten => 3,3,Dial(Zap/5r3&Zap/6r3,35,tmPA(beep))
+    or
+exten => 3,3,Dial(Zap/5r3&Zap/6r3,35,tmP(something)A(beep))
+    or
+exten => 3,3,Dial(Zap/5r3&Zap/6r3,35,tmpA(beep))
 \end{verbatim}
 
 The 't' allows the dialed party to transfer the call using '\#'. It's
@@ -188,7 +187,7 @@ P(some-shared-key). Also, if the same person has multiple extensions,
 use P(unique-id) on all their dial commands.
 
 Use little 'p' for screening. Every incoming call will include a
-prompt for the callee's choice. 
+prompt for the callee's choice.
 
 the A(beep), will generate a 'beep' that the callee will hear if they
 choose to talk to the caller. It's kind of a prompt to let the callee
@@ -197,7 +196,7 @@ helpful.
 
 When there is no CallerID, P and p options will always record an intro
 for the incoming caller. This intro will be stored temporarily in the
-/var/lib/asterisk/sounds/priv-callerintros dir, under the name
+\path{/var/lib/asterisk/sounds/priv-callerintros} dir, under the name
 NOCALLERID\_$<$extension$>$ $<$channelname$>$ and will be erased after the
 callee decides what to do with the call.
 
@@ -232,7 +231,7 @@ introductions are stored and re-used for the convenience of the CALLER.
 \subsubsection{Introductions}
 Unless instructed to not save introductions (see the 'n' option above),
 the screening modes will save the recordings of the caller's names in
-the directory /var/lib/asterisk/sounds/priv-callerintros, if they have
+the directory \path{/var/lib/asterisk/sounds/priv-callerintros}, if they have
 a CallerID.  Just the 10-digit callerid numbers are used as filenames,
 with a ".gsm" at the end.
 
@@ -246,14 +245,15 @@ Next of all, these intros can be used in voicemail, played over
 loudspeakers, and perhaps other nifty things. For instance:
 
 \begin{verbatim}
-exten => s,7,System(/usr/bin/play /var/lib/asterisk/sounds/priv-callerintros/${CALLERID(num)}.gsm&|0) 
+exten => s,6,Set(PATH=/var/lib/asterisk/sounds/priv-callerintros)
+exten => s,7,System(/usr/bin/play ${PATH}/${CALLERID(num)}.gsm&,0)
 \end{verbatim}
 
 When a call comes in at the house, the above priority gets executed,
 and the callers intro is played over the phone systems speakers. This
 gives us a hint who is calling.
 
-(Note: the |0 option at the end of the System command above, is a
+(Note: the ,0 option at the end of the System command above, is a
 local mod I made to the System command. It forces a 0 result code to
 be returned, whether the play command successfully completed or
 not. Therefore, I don't have to ensure that the file exists or
@@ -264,12 +264,13 @@ handle it a little more intelligently)
 And one other thing. You can easily supply your callers with an option
 to listen to, and re-record their introductions. Here's what I did in
 the home system's extensions.conf. (assume that a
-Goto(home-introduction|s|1) exists somewhere in your main menu as an
+Goto(home-introduction,s,1) exists somewhere in your main menu as an
 option):
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 [home-introduction]
-exten => s,1,Background,intro-options ;; Script: 
+exten => s,1,Background(intro-options) ;; Script:
      ;; To hear your Introduction, dial 1.
      ;;    to record a new introduction, dial 2.
      ;;    to return to the main menu, dial 3.
@@ -278,7 +279,7 @@ exten => 1,1,Playback,priv-callerintros/${CALLERID(num)}
 exten => 1,2,Goto(s,1)
 exten => 2,1,Goto(home-introduction-record,s,1)
 exten => 3,1,Goto(homeline,s,7)
-exten => 4,1,Playback,intro-intro
+exten => 4,1,Playback(intro-intro)
      ;; Script:
      ;; This may seem a little strange, but it really is a neat
      ;; thing, both for you and for us. I've taped a short introduction
@@ -292,26 +293,26 @@ exten => 4,1,Playback,intro-intro
      ;; using this menu.
 exten => 4,2,Goto(s,1)
 exten => t,1,Goto(s,1)
-exten => i,1,Background,invalid
+exten => i,1,Background(invalid)
 exten => i,2,Goto(s,1)
 exten => o,1,Goto(s,1)
 
 [home-introduction-record]
-exten => s,1,Background,intro-record-choices    ;; Script:
+exten => s,1,Background(intro-record-choices)    ;; Script:
      ;; If you want some advice about recording your
-     ;; introduction, dial 1. 
+     ;; introduction, dial 1.
      ;; otherwise, dial 2, and introduce yourself after
      ;; the beep.
-exten => 1,1,Playback,intro-record
+exten => 1,1,Playback(intro-record)
      ;; Your introduction should be short and sweet and crisp.
      ;; Your introduction will be limited to 4 seconds.
      ;; This is NOT meant to be a voice mail message, so
      ;; please, don't say anything about why you are calling.
      ;; After we are done making the recording, your introduction
-     ;; will be saved for playback. 
-     ;; If you are the only person that would call from this number, 
+     ;; will be saved for playback.
+     ;; If you are the only person that would call from this number,
      ;; please state your name.  Otherwise, state your business
-     ;; or residence name instead. For instance, if you are 
+     ;; or residence name instead. For instance, if you are
      ;; friend of the family, say, Olie McPherson, and both
      ;; you and your kids might call here a lot, you might
      ;; say: "This is the distinguished Olie McPherson Residence!"
@@ -322,22 +323,23 @@ exten => 1,1,Playback,intro-record
      ;; "John, from the Park County Morgue. You stab 'em, we slab 'em!".
      ;; Just one caution: the kids will hear what you record every time
      ;; you call. So watch your language!
-     ;; I will begin recording after the tone. 
-     ;; When you are done, hit the # key. Gather your thoughts and get 
+     ;; I will begin recording after the tone.
+     ;; When you are done, hit the # key. Gather your thoughts and get
      ;; ready. Remember, the # key will end the recording, and play back
      ;; your intro. Good Luck, and Thank you!"
 exten => 1,2,Goto(2,1)
-exten => 2,1,Background,intro-start
+exten => 2,1,Background(intro-start)
      ;;  OK, here we go! After the beep, please give your introduction.
-exten => 2,2,Background,beep
-exten => 2,3,Record,priv-callerintros/${CALLERID(num)}:gsm|4
-exten => 2,4,Background,priv-callerintros/${CALLERID(num)}
+exten => 2,2,Background(beep)
+exten => 2,3,Record(priv-callerintros/${CALLERID(num)}:gsm,4)
+exten => 2,4,Background(priv-callerintros/${CALLERID(num)})
 exten => 2,5,Goto(home-introduction,s,1)
 exten => t,1,Goto(s,1)
-exten => i,1,Background,invalid
+exten => i,1,Background(invalid)
 exten => i,2,Goto(s,1)
 exten => o,1,Goto(s,1)
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 In the above, you'd most likely reword the messages to your liking,
 and maybe do more advanced things with the 'error' conditions (i,o,t priorities),
index 306dc37..9454876 100644 (file)
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
 \section{Introduction}
 
 Pardon, but the dialplan in this tutorial will be expressed
-in AEL, the new Asterisk Extension Language. If you are 
+in AEL, the new Asterisk Extension Language. If you are
 not used to its syntax, we hope you will find it to some
 degree intuitive. If not, there are documents explaining
 its syntax and constructs.
@@ -15,6 +15,7 @@ First of all, set up call queues in queue.conf
 
 Here is an example:
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
    =========== queues.conf ===========
    | ; Cool Digium Queues            |
@@ -46,8 +47,9 @@ Here is an example:
    | leavewhenempty=strict           |
    ===================================
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
-In the above, we have defined 3 separate calling queues: 
+In the above, we have defined 3 separate calling queues:
 sales-general, customerservice, and dispatch.
 
 Please note that the sales-general queue specifies a
@@ -58,16 +60,16 @@ contexts must be defined somewhere in your dialplan.
 We will show them after the main menu below.
 
 In the [general] section, specifying the persistentmembers=yes,
-will cause the agent lists to be stored in astdb, and 
+will cause the agent lists to be stored in astdb, and
 recalled on startup.
 
 The strategy=ringall will cause all agents to be dialed
 together, the first to answer is then assigned the incoming
-call. 
+call.
 
 "joinempty" set to "strict" will keep incoming callers from
 being placed in queues where there are no agents to take calls.
-The Queue() application will return, and the dial plan can 
+The Queue() application will return, and the dial plan can
 determine what to do next.
 
 If there are calls queued, and the last agent logs out, the
@@ -80,11 +82,12 @@ set to "strict".
 
 Then in extensions.ael, you can do these things:
 
-\subsubsection{The Main Menu} 
+\subsubsection{The Main Menu}
 
 At Digium, incoming callers are sent to the "mainmenu" context, where they
 are greeted, and directed to the numbers they choose...
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 context mainmenu {
 
@@ -93,10 +96,10 @@ context mainmenu {
                queues-loginout;
        }
 
-        0 => goto dispatch|s|1;
-        2 => goto sales|s|1;
-        3 => goto customerservice|s|1;
-        4 => goto dispatch|s|1;
+        0 => goto dispatch,s,1;
+        2 => goto sales,s,1;
+        3 => goto customerservice,s,1;
+        4 => goto dispatch,s,1;
 
         s => {
                 Ringing();
@@ -133,13 +136,15 @@ context mainmenu {
         }
 }
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 \subsubsection{The Contexts referenced from the queues.conf file}
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 context sales {
 
-        0 => goto dispatch|s|1;
+        0 => goto dispatch,s,1;
         8 => Voicemail(${SALESVM});
 
         s => {
@@ -151,18 +156,20 @@ context sales {
                 WaitExten(0.3);
                 Background(digium/AtAnyTimeYouMayPress0ToSpeakWithAnOperatorOr8ToLeaveAMessage);
                 Set(CALLERID(name)=Sales);
-                Queue(sales-general|t);
+                Queue(sales-general,t);
                 Set(CALLERID(name)=EmptySalQ);
-                goto dispatch|s|1;
+                goto dispatch,s,1;
                 Playback(goodbye);
                 Hangup();
         }
 }
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 Please note that there is only one attempt to queue a call in the sales queue. All sales agents that
 are logged in will be rung.
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 context customerservice {
 
@@ -183,11 +190,11 @@ context customerservice {
                 Background(digium/AtAnyTimeYouMayPress0ToSpeakWithAnOperatorOr8ToLeaveAMessage);
                 Set(CALLERID(name)=Cust Svc);
                 Set(QUEUE_MAX_PENALTY=10);
-                Queue(customerservice|t);
+                Queue(customerservice,t);
                 Set(QUEUE_MAX_PENALTY=0);
-                Queue(customerservice|t);
+                Queue(customerservice,t);
                 Set(CALLERID(name)=EmptyCSVQ);
-                goto dispatch|s|1;
+                goto dispatch,s,1;
                 Background(digium/NoCustomerServiceRepresentativesAreAvailableAtThisTime);
                 Background(digium/PleaseLeaveAMessageInTheCustomerServiceVoiceMailBox);
                 Voicemail(${CUSTSERVVM});
@@ -196,11 +203,13 @@ context customerservice {
         }
 }
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 Note that calls coming into customerservice will first be try to queue
 calls to those agents with a QUEUE\_MAX\_PENALTY of 10, and if none are available,
 then all agents are rung.
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 context dispatch
 {
@@ -226,21 +235,22 @@ context dispatch
         }
 }
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 And in the dispatch context, first agents of priority 10 are tried, then
-20, and if none are available, all agents are tried. 
+20, and if none are available, all agents are tried.
 
 Notice that a common pattern is followed in each of the three queue contexts:
 
 First, you set QUEUE\_MAX\_PENALTY to a value, then you call
 Queue($<$queue-name$>$,option,...) (see the Queue application documetation for details)
 
-In the above, note that the "t" option is specified, and this allows the 
-agent picking up the incoming call the luxury of transferring the call to 
+In the above, note that the "t" option is specified, and this allows the
+agent picking up the incoming call the luxury of transferring the call to
 other parties.
 
 The purpose of specifying the QUEUE\_MAX\_PENALTY is to develop a set of priorities
-amongst agents. By the above usage, agents with lower number priorities will 
+amongst agents. By the above usage, agents with lower number priorities will
 be given the calls first, and then, if no-one picks up the call, the QUEUE\_MAX\_PENALTY
 will be incremented, and the queue tried again. Hopefully, along the line, someone
 will pick up the call, and the Queue application will end with a hangup.
@@ -251,12 +261,12 @@ to zero, which means to try all available agents.
 
 \subsection{Assigning agents to Queues}
 
-In this example dialplan, we want to be able to add and remove agents to 
+In this example dialplan, we want to be able to add and remove agents to
 handle incoming calls, as they feel they are available. As they log in,
 they are added to the queue's agent list, and as they log out, they are
 removed. If no agents are available, the queue command will terminate, and
 it is the duty of the dialplan to do something appropriate, be it sending
-the incoming caller to voicemail, or trying the queue again with a higher 
+the incoming caller to voicemail, or trying the queue again with a higher
 QUEUE\_MAX\_PENALTY.
 
 Because a single agent can make themselves available to more than one queue,
@@ -265,6 +275,7 @@ dialplan.
 
 \subsubsection{Agents Log In and Out}
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 context queues-loginout
 {
@@ -284,14 +295,16 @@ context queues-loginout
                 }
 }
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 In the above contexts, the agents dial 6092 to log into their queues,
 and they dial 6093 to log out of their queues. The agent is prompted
-for their agent number, and if they are logging in, their passcode, 
-and then they are transferred to the proper extension in the 
-queues-manip context.  The queues-manip context does all the 
+for their agent number, and if they are logging in, their passcode,
+and then they are transferred to the proper extension in the
+queues-manip context.  The queues-manip context does all the
 actual work:
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 context queues-manip {
 
@@ -324,27 +337,29 @@ context queues-manip {
         }
 }
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 In the above extensions, note that the queue-addremove macro is used
 to actually add or remove the agent from the applicable queue,
-with the applicable priority level. Note that agents with a 
+with the applicable priority level. Note that agents with a
 priority level of 10 will be called before agents with levels
 of 20 or 30.
 
 In the above example, Raquel will be dialed first in the dispatch
 queue, if she has logged in. If she is not, then the second call of
 Queue() with priority of 20 will dial Brittanica if she is present,
-otherwise the third call of Queue() with MAX\_PENALTY of 0 will 
+otherwise the third call of Queue() with MAX\_PENALTY of 0 will
 dial Rock and Saline simultaneously.
 
-Also note that Rock will be among the first to be called in the sales-general 
+Also note that Rock will be among the first to be called in the sales-general
 queue, and among the last in the dispatch queue. As you can see in
-main menu, the callerID is set in the main menu so they can tell 
+main menu, the callerID is set in the main menu so they can tell
 which queue incoming calls are coming from.
 
 The call to queue-success() gives some feedback to the agent
 as they log in and out, that the process has completed.
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 macro queue-success(exten)
 {
@@ -362,9 +377,11 @@ macro queue-success(exten)
         }
 }
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 The queue-addremove macro is defined in this manner:
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 macro queue-addremove(queuename,penalty,exten)
 {
@@ -397,6 +414,7 @@ macro queue-addremove(queuename,penalty,exten)
         }
 }
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 Basically, it uses the first character of the exten variable, to determine the
 proper actions to take. In the above dial plan code, only the cases I or O are used,
@@ -408,6 +426,7 @@ which correspond to the Login and Logout actions.
 Notice in the above, that the commands to manipulate agents in queues have
 "@agents" in their arguments. This is a reference to the agents context:
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 context agents
 {
@@ -415,21 +434,21 @@ context agents
        8010 =>
        {
                Set(QUEUE_MAX_PENALTY=10);
-               Queue(sales-general|t);
+               Queue(sales-general,t);
                Set(QUEUE_MAX_PENALTY=0);
-               Queue(sales-general|t);
+               Queue(sales-general,t);
                Set(CALLERID(name)=EmptySalQ);
-               goto dispatch|s|1;
+               goto dispatch,s,1;
        }
        // Customer Service queue
        8011 =>
        {
                Set(QUEUE_MAX_PENALTY=10);
-               Queue(customerservice|t);
+               Queue(customerservice,t);
                Set(QUEUE_MAX_PENALTY=0);
-               Queue(customerservice|t);
+               Queue(customerservice,t);
                Set(CALLERID(name)=EMptyCSVQ);
-               goto dispatch|s|1;
+               goto dispatch,s,1;
        }
        8013 =>
        {
@@ -442,7 +461,7 @@ context agents
                Queue(support-dispatch,t);
                Set(QUEUE_MAX_PENALTY=0); // means no max
                Queue(support-dispatch,t);
-               goto dispatch|s|1;
+               goto dispatch,s,1;
        }
        6121 => &callagent(${RAQUEL},${EXTEN});
        6165 => &callagent(${SPEARS},${EXTEN});
@@ -450,27 +469,29 @@ context agents
        6070 => &callagent(${SALINE},${EXTEN});
 }
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 In the above, the variables \${RAQUEL}, etc stand for
 actual devices to ring that person's
 phone (like Zap/37).
 
 The 8010, 8011, and 8013 extensions are purely for transferring
-incoming callers to queues. For instance, a customer service 
-agent might want to transfer the caller to talk to sales. The 
+incoming callers to queues. For instance, a customer service
+agent might want to transfer the caller to talk to sales. The
 agent only has to transfer to extension 8010, in this case.
 
 Here is the callagent macro, note that if a person in the
 queue is called, but does not answer, then they are automatically
 removed from the queue.
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 macro callagent(device,exten)
 {
        if( ${GROUP_COUNT(${exten}@agents)}=0 )
        {
                Set(OUTBOUND_GROUP=${exten}@agents);
-               Dial(${device}|300|t);
+               Dial(${device},300,t);
                switch(${DIALSTATUS})
                {
                case BUSY:
@@ -478,7 +499,7 @@ macro callagent(device,exten)
                        break;
                case NOANSWER:
                        Set(queue-announce-success=0);
-                       goto queues-manip|O${exten}|1;
+                       goto queues-manip,O${exten},1;
                default:
                        Hangup();
                        break;
@@ -490,6 +511,7 @@ macro callagent(device,exten)
        }
 }
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 In the callagent macro above, the \${exten} will
 be 6121, or 6165, etc, which is the extension of the agent.
@@ -498,10 +520,10 @@ The use of the GROUP\_COUNT, and OUTBOUND\_GROUP follow this line
 of thinking. Incoming calls can be queued to ring all agents in the
 current priority. If some of those agents are already talking, they
 would get bothersome call-waiting tones. To avoid this inconvenience,
-when an agent gets a call, the OUTBOUND\_GROUP assigns that 
+when an agent gets a call, the OUTBOUND\_GROUP assigns that
 conversation to the group specified, for instance 6171@agents.
 The \${GROUP\_COUNT()} variable on a subsequent call should return
-"1" for that group. If GROUP\_COUNT returns 1, then the busy() 
+"1" for that group. If GROUP\_COUNT returns 1, then the busy()
 is returned without actually trying to dial the agent.
 
 \subsection{Pre Acknowledgement Message}
@@ -509,16 +531,17 @@ is returned without actually trying to dial the agent.
 If you would like to have a pre acknowledge message with option to reject the message
 you can use the following dialplan Macro as a base with the 'M' dial argument.
 
+\begin{astlisting}
 \begin{verbatim}
 [macro-screen]
 exten=>s,1,Wait(.25)
-exten=>s,2,Read(ACCEPT|screen-callee-options|1)
+exten=>s,2,Read(ACCEPT,screen-callee-options,1)
 exten=>s,3,Gotoif($[${ACCEPT} = 1] ?50)
 exten=>s,4,Gotoif($[${ACCEPT} = 2] ?30)
 exten=>s,5,Gotoif($[${ACCEPT} = 3] ?40)
 exten=>s,6,Gotoif($[${ACCEPT} = 4] ?30:30)
 exten=>s,30,Set(MACRO_RESULT=CONTINUE)
-exten=>s,40,Read(TEXTEN|custom/screen-exten|)
+exten=>s,40,Read(TEXTEN,custom/screen-exten,)
 exten=>s,41,Gotoif($[${LEN(${TEXTEN})} = 3]?42:45)
 exten=>s,42,Set(MACRO_RESULT=GOTO:from-internal^${TEXTEN}^1)
 exten=>s,45,Gotoif($[${TEXTEN} = 0] ?46:4)
@@ -527,6 +550,7 @@ exten=>s,50,Playback(after-the-tone)
 exten=>s,51,Playback(connected)
 exten=>s,52,Playback(beep)
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{astlisting}
 
 \subsection{Caveats}
 
index efcd6b4..3597540 100644 (file)
@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ device=Local/disa@line4_outbound
 exten => 12564286000,1,SLATrunk(line4)
 
 [line4_outbound]
-exten => disa,1,Disa(no-password|line4_outbound)
+exten => disa,1,Disa(no-password,line4_outbound)
 exten => _1NXXNXXXXXX,1,Dial(SIP/\${EXTEN}@mytrunk)
 \end{verbatim}
 
@@ -277,18 +277,18 @@ extensions.conf:
 \begin{verbatim}
 [macro-slaline]
 exten => s,1,SLATrunk(${ARG1})
-exten => s,n,Goto(s-${SLATRUNK_STATUS}|1)
-exten => s-FAILURE,1,Voicemail(1234|u)
-exten => s-UNANSWERED,1,Voicemail(1234|u)
+exten => s,n,Goto(s-${SLATRUNK_STATUS},1)
+exten => s-FAILURE,1,Voicemail(1234,u)
+exten => s-UNANSWERED,1,Voicemail(1234,u)
 
 [line1]
-exten => s,1,Macro(slaline|line1)
+exten => s,1,Macro(slaline,line1)
 
 [line2]
-exten => s,2,Macro(slaline|line2)
+exten => s,2,Macro(slaline,line2)
 
 [line1_outbound]
-exten => disa,1,Disa(no-password|line1_outbound)
+exten => disa,1,Disa(no-password,line1_outbound)
 exten => _1NXXNXXXXXX,1,Dial(Zap/1/${EXTEN})
 exten => 8500,1,VoicemailMain(1234)