e62e5d35b4a24620d553ebfe6d6d93e181633ed1
[asterisk/asterisk.git] / doc / README.variables
1 EXTENSION LOGIC : 
2
3 There are two levels of parameter evaluation done in asterisk in 
4 extensions.conf.
5 The first, and most frequently used, is the substitution of variable
6 references with their values. 
7
8 Then there are the evaluations done in $[ .. ]. This will be
9 discussed below.
10
11 ___________________________
12 PARAMETER QUOTING: 
13 ---------------------------
14
15 exten => s,5,BackGround,blabla
16
17 The parameter (blabla) can be quoted ("blabla"). In this case, a 
18 comma does not terminate the field. However, the double quotes
19 will be passed down to the Background command, in this example.
20
21 Also, characters special to variable substitution, expression evaluation, etc
22 (see below), can be quoted. For example, to literally use a $ on the 
23 string "$1231", quote it with a preceding \. Special characters that must
24 be quoted to be used, are [ ] $ " \. (to write \ itself, use \\). 
25
26 These Double quotes and escapes are evaluated at the level of the
27 asterisk config file parser. 
28
29 Double quotes can also be used inside expressions, as discussed below.
30
31
32 ___________________________
33 VARIABLES: 
34 ---------------------------
35
36 Parameter strings can include variables. Variable names are arbitrary strings. 
37 They are stored in the respective channel structure. 
38
39 To set a variable to a particular value, do : 
40
41 ;exten => 1,2,SetVar,varname=value
42
43 You can substitute the value of a variable everywhere using ${variablename}.
44 For example, to stringwise append $lala to $blabla and store result in $koko, 
45 do: 
46
47 ;exten => 1,2,SetVar,koko=${blabla}${lala}
48
49 There are also the following special variables: 
50
51 ${CALLERID}     Caller ID
52 ${CALLERIDNAME} Caller ID Name only
53 ${CALLERIDNUM}  Caller ID Number only
54 ${EXTEN}        Current extension
55 ${CONTEXT}      Current context
56 ${PRIORITY}     Current priority
57 ${CHANNEL}      Current channel name
58 ${ENV(VAR)}     Environmental variable VAR
59 ${LEN(VAR)}     String length of VAR (integer)
60 ${EPOCH}        Current unix style epoch
61 ${DATETIME}     Current date time in the format: YYYY-MM-DD_HH:MM:SS
62 ${TIMESTAMP}    Current date time in the format: YYYYMMDD-HHMMSS
63 ${UNIQUEID}     Current call unique identifier
64 ${DNID}         Dialed Number Identifier
65 ${RDNIS}        Redirected Dial Number ID Service
66 ${HANGUPCAUSE}  Asterisk hangup cause
67 ${ACCOUNTCODE}  Account code (if specified)
68 ${LANGUAGE}     Current language
69 ${SIPDOMAIN}    SIP destination domain of an inbound call (if appropriate)
70
71 There are two reference modes - reference by value and reference by name. 
72 To refer to a variable with its name (as an argument to a function that 
73 requires a variable), just write the name. To refer to the variable's value, 
74 enclose it inside ${}. For example, SetVar takes as the first argument 
75 (before the =) a variable name, so: 
76
77 ;exten => 1,2,SetVar,koko=lala
78 ;exten => 1,3,SetVar,${koko}=blabla
79
80 stores to the variable "koko" the value "lala" and to variable "lala" the 
81 value "blabla". 
82
83 In fact, everything contained ${here} is just replaced with the value of 
84 the variable "here". 
85
86 ___________________________
87 EXPRESSIONS: 
88 ---------------------------
89
90 Everything contained inside a bracket pair prefixed by a $ (like $[this]) is 
91 considered as an expression and it is evaluated. Evaluation works similar to 
92 (but is done on a later stage than) variable substitution: the expression 
93 (including the square brackets) is replaced by the result of the expression 
94 evaluation. The arguments and operands of the expression MUST BE separated 
95 by at least one space. 
96
97
98 For example, after the sequence: 
99
100 exten => 1,1,SetVar,"lala=$[1 + 2]";
101 exten => 1,2,SetVar,"koko=$[2 * ${lala}]";
102
103 the value of variable koko is "6".
104
105 And, further:
106
107 exten => 1,1,SetVar,"lala=$[1+2]";
108
109 will not work as you might have expected. Since all the chars in the single 
110 token "1+2" are not numbers, it will be evaluated as the string "1+2". Again,
111 please do not forget, that this is a very simple parsing engine, and it
112 uses a space (at least one), to separate "tokens".
113
114 and, further:
115
116 exten => 1,1,SetVar,"lala=$[  1 +    2   ]";
117
118 will parse as intended. Extra spaces are ignored.
119
120 ___________________________
121 SPACES INSIDE VARIABLE
122 ---------------------------
123 If the variable being evaluated contains spaces, there can be problems.
124
125 For these cases, double quotes around text that may contain spaces
126 will force the surrounded text to be evaluated as a single token.
127 The double quotes will be counted as part of that lexical token.
128
129 As an example:
130
131 exten => s,6,GotoIf($[ "${CALLERIDNAME}" : "Privacy Manager" ]?callerid-liar|s|1:s|7)
132
133 The variable CALLERIDNAME could evaluate to "DELOREAN MOTORS" (with a space)
134 but the above will evaluate to:
135
136 "DELOREAN MOTORS" : "Privacy Manager"
137
138 and will evaluate to 0.
139
140 The above without double quotes would have evaluated to:
141
142 DELOREAN MOTORS : Privacy Manager
143
144 and will result in syntax errors, because token DELOREAN is immediately
145 followed by token MOTORS and the expression parser will not know how to 
146 evaluate this expression.
147
148 _____________________
149 OPERATORS
150 ---------------------
151 Operators are listed below in order of increasing precedence.  Operators
152 with equal precedence are grouped within { } symbols.
153
154      expr1 | expr2
155              Return the evaluation of expr1 if it is neither an empty string
156              nor zero; otherwise, returns the evaluation of expr2.
157
158      expr1 & expr2
159              Return the evaluation of expr1 if neither expression evaluates to
160              an empty string or zero; otherwise, returns zero.
161
162      expr1 {=, >, >=, <, <=, !=} expr2
163              Return the results of integer comparison if both arguments are
164              integers; otherwise, returns the results of string comparison
165              using the locale-specific collation sequence.  The result of each
166              comparison is 1 if the specified relation is true, or 0 if the
167              relation is false.
168
169      expr1 {+, -} expr2
170              Return the results of addition or subtraction of integer-valued
171              arguments.
172
173      expr1 {*, /, %} expr2
174              Return the results of multiplication, integer division, or
175              remainder of integer-valued arguments.
176
177      expr1 : expr2
178              The `:' operator matches expr1 against expr2, which must be a
179              regular expression.  The regular expression is anchored to the
180              beginning of  the string with an implicit `^'.
181
182              If the match succeeds and the pattern contains at least one regu-
183              lar expression subexpression `\(...\)', the string correspond-
184              ing to `\1' is returned; otherwise the matching operator
185              returns the number of characters matched.  If the match fails and
186              the pattern contains a regular expression subexpression the null
187              string is returned; otherwise 0.
188
189 Parentheses are used for grouping in the usual manner.
190
191 The parser must be parsed with bison (bison is REQUIRED - yacc cannot 
192 produce pure parsers, which are reentrant) 
193
194 ___________________________
195 CONDITIONALS
196 ---------------------------
197
198 There is one conditional operator - the conditional goto : 
199
200 ;exten => 1,2,gotoif,condition?label1:label2
201
202 If condition is true go to label1, else go to label2. Labels are interpreted
203 exactly as in the normal goto command.
204
205 "condition" is just a string. If the string is empty or "0", the condition
206 is considered to be false, if it's anything else, the condition is true. 
207 This is designed to be used together with the expression syntax described 
208 above, eg : 
209
210 exten => 1,2,gotoif,$[${CALLERID} = 123456]?2|1:3|1
211
212
213 Example of use : 
214
215 exten => s,2,SetVar,"vara=1"
216 exten => s,3,SetVar,"varb=$[${vara} + 2]"
217 exten => s,4,SetVar,"varc=$[${varb} * 2]"
218 exten => s,5,GotoIf,"$[${varc} = 6]?99|1:s|6";
219
220 ___________________________
221 PARSE ERRORS
222 ---------------------------
223
224 Syntax errors are now output with 3 lines.
225
226 If the extensions.conf file contains a line like:
227
228 exten => s,6,GotoIf($[ "${CALLERIDNUM}"  = "3071234567" & "${CALLERIDNAME}" : "Privacy Manager" ]?callerid-liar|s|1:s|7)
229
230 You may see an error in /var/log/asterisk/messages like this:
231
232 May  3 15:58:53 WARNING[1234455344]: ast_yyerror(): syntax error: parse error; Input:
233  "3072312154"  : "3071234567" & & "Steves Extension" : "Privacy Manager"
234  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
235                                   ^
236
237 The first line shows the string passed to the expression parser. This
238 string is the result of the variable replacements, etc. This way, you
239 can see the actual string that went into the parser.
240
241 The second line usually shows a string of '^' chars, that show what's
242 been legally parsed so far.
243
244 And the third line shows where the parser was (lookahead token lexing,
245 etc), when the parse hit the rocks. A single '^' here. The error is
246 going to be somewhere between the last '^' on the second line, and the
247 '^' on the third line. That's right, in the example above, there are two
248 '&' chars, separated by a space, and this is a definite no-no!
249
250
251 ___________________________
252 NULL STRINGS
253 ---------------------------
254
255 Testing to see if a string is null can be done in one of two different ways:
256
257 exten => _XX.,1,GotoIf($["${calledid}" != ""]?3) 
258
259 exten => _XX.,1,GotoIf($[foo${calledid} != foo]?3) 
260
261
262 The second example above is the way suggested by the WIKI. It will 
263 work as long as there are no spaces in the evaluated value.
264
265 The first way should work in all cases, and indeed, might now
266 be the safest way to handle this situation.
267
268 ___________________________
269 WARNING
270 ---------------------------
271
272 If you need to do complicated things with strings, asterisk expressions
273 is most likely NOT the best way to go about it. AGI scripts are an
274 excellent option to this need, and make available the full power of
275 whatever language you desire, be it Perl, C, C++, Cobol, RPG, Java,
276 Snobol, PL/I, Scheme, Common Lisp, Shell scripts, Tcl, Forth, Modula,
277 Pascal, APL, assembler, etc.
278