c26c299b06654866c83cbce4c5d78334270f838b
[asterisk/asterisk.git] / include / asterisk / astobj2.h
1 /*
2  * astobj2 - replacement containers for asterisk data structures.
3  *
4  * Copyright (C) 2006 Marta Carbone, Luigi Rizzo - Univ. di Pisa, Italy
5  *
6  * See http://www.asterisk.org for more information about
7  * the Asterisk project. Please do not directly contact
8  * any of the maintainers of this project for assistance;
9  * the project provides a web site, mailing lists and IRC
10  * channels for your use.
11  *
12  * This program is free software, distributed under the terms of
13  * the GNU General Public License Version 2. See the LICENSE file
14  * at the top of the source tree.
15  */
16
17 #ifndef _ASTERISK_ASTOBJ2_H
18 #define _ASTERISK_ASTOBJ2_H
19
20 #include "asterisk/lock.h"
21
22 /*! \file 
23  *
24  * \brief Object Model implementing objects and containers.
25
26 These functions implement an abstraction for objects (with
27 locks and reference counts) and containers for these user-defined objects,
28 supporting locking, reference counting and callbacks.
29
30 The internal implementation of the container is opaque to the user,
31 so we can use different data structures as needs arise.
32
33 At the moment, however, the only internal data structure is a hash
34 table. When other structures will be implemented, the initialization
35 function may change.
36
37 USAGE - OBJECTS
38
39 An object is a block of memory that must be allocated with the
40 function ao2_alloc(), and for which the system keeps track (with
41 abit of help from the programmer) of the number of references around.
42 When an object has no more references, it is destroyed, by first
43 invoking whatever 'destructor' function the programmer specifies
44 (it can be NULL), and then freeing the memory.
45 This way objects can be shared without worrying who is in charge
46 of freeing them.
47
48 Basically, creating an object requires the size of the object and
49 and a pointer to the destructor function:
50  
51     struct foo *o;
52  
53     o = ao2_alloc(sizeof(struct foo), my_destructor_fn);
54
55 The object returned has a refcount = 1.
56 Note that the memory for the object is allocated and zeroed.
57 - We cannot realloc() the object itself.
58 - We cannot call free(o) to dispose of the object; rather we
59   tell the system that we do not need the reference anymore:
60
61     ao2_ref(o, -1)
62
63   causing the destructor to be called (and then memory freed) when
64   the refcount goes to 0. This is also available as ao2_unref(o),
65   and returns NULL as a convenience, so you can do things like
66         o = ao2_unref(o);
67   and clean the original pointer to prevent errors.
68
69 - ao2_ref(o, +1) can be used to modify the refcount on the
70   object in case we want to pass it around.
71         
72
73 - other calls on the object are ao2_lock(obj), ao2_unlock(),
74   ao2_trylock(), to manipulate the lock.
75
76
77 USAGE - CONTAINERS
78
79 A containers is an abstract data structure where we can store
80 objects, search them (hopefully in an efficient way), and iterate
81 or apply a callback function to them. A container is just an object
82 itself.
83
84 A container must first be allocated, specifying the initial
85 parameters. At the moment, this is done as follows:
86
87     <b>Sample Usage:</b>
88     \code
89
90     struct ao2_container *c;
91
92     c = ao2_container_alloc(MAX_BUCKETS, my_hash_fn, my_cmp_fn);
93     \endcode
94 where
95 - MAX_BUCKETS is the number of buckets in the hash table,
96 - my_hash_fn() is the (user-supplied) function that returns a
97   hash key for the object (further reduced moduly MAX_BUCKETS
98   by the container's code);
99 - my_cmp_fn() is the default comparison function used when doing
100   searches on the container,
101
102 A container knows little or nothing about the object itself,
103 other than the fact that it has been created by ao2_alloc()
104 All knowledge of the (user-defined) internals of the object
105 is left to the (user-supplied) functions passed as arguments
106 to ao2_container_alloc().
107
108 If we want to insert the object in the container, we should
109 initialize its fields -- especially, those used by my_hash_fn() --
110 to compute the bucket to use.
111 Once done, we can link an object to a container with
112
113     ao2_link(c, o);
114
115 The function returns NULL in case of errors (and the object
116 is not inserted in the container). Other values mean success
117 (we are not supposed to use the value as a pointer to anything).
118
119 \note inserting the object in the container grabs the reference
120 to the object (which is now owned by the container) so we do not
121 need to drop ours when we are done.
122
123 \note While an object o is in a container, we expect that
124 my_hash_fn(o) will always return the same value. The function
125 does not lock the object to be computed, so modifications of
126 those fields that affect the computation of the hash should
127 be done by extractiong the object from the container, and
128 reinserting it after the change (this is not terribly expensive).
129
130 \note A container with a single buckets is effectively a linked
131 list. However there is no ordering among elements.
132
133 Objects implement a reference counter keeping the count
134 of the number of references that reference an object.
135
136 When this number becomes zero the destructor will be
137 called and the object will be free'd.
138  */
139
140 /*!
141  * Invoked just before freeing the memory for the object.
142  * It is passed a pointer to user data.
143  */
144 typedef void (*ao2_destructor_fn)(void *);
145
146 void ao2_bt(void);      /* backtrace */
147 /*!
148  * Allocate and initialize an object.
149  * 
150  * \param data_size The sizeof() of user-defined structure.
151  * \param destructor_fn The function destructor (can be NULL)
152  * \return A pointer to user data. 
153  *
154  * Allocates a struct astobj2 with sufficient space for the
155  * user-defined structure.
156  * \note
157  * - storage is zeroed; XXX maybe we want a flag to enable/disable this.
158  * - the refcount of the object just created is 1
159  * - the returned pointer cannot be free()'d or realloc()'ed;
160  *   rather, we just call ao2_ref(o, -1);
161  */
162 void *ao2_alloc(const size_t data_size, ao2_destructor_fn destructor_fn);
163
164 /*!
165  * Reference/unreference an object and return the old refcount.
166  *
167  * \param o A pointer to the object
168  * \param delta Value to add to the reference counter.
169  * \return The value of the reference counter before the operation.
170  *
171  * Increase/decrease the reference counter according
172  * the value of delta.
173  *
174  * If the refcount goes to zero, the object is destroyed.
175  *
176  * \note The object must not be locked by the caller of this function, as
177  *       it is invalid to try to unlock it after releasing the reference.
178  *
179  * \note if we know the pointer to an object, it is because we
180  * have a reference count to it, so the only case when the object
181  * can go away is when we release our reference, and it is
182  * the last one in existence.
183  */
184 int ao2_ref(void *o, int delta);
185
186 /*!
187  * Lock an object.
188  * 
189  * \param a A pointer to the object we want lock.
190  * \return 0 on success, other values on error.
191  */
192 int ao2_lock(void *a);
193
194 /*!
195  * Unlock an object.
196  * 
197  * \param a A pointer to the object we want unlock.
198  * \return 0 on success, other values on error.
199  */
200 int ao2_unlock(void *a);
201
202 /*!
203  *
204  * Containers
205
206 containers are data structures meant to store several objects,
207 and perform various operations on them.
208 Internally, objects are stored in lists, hash tables or other
209 data structures depending on the needs.
210
211 NOTA BENE: at the moment the only container we support is the
212 hash table and its degenerate form, the list.
213
214 Operations on container include:
215
216     c = ao2_container_alloc(size, cmp_fn, hash_fn)
217         allocate a container with desired size and default compare
218         and hash function
219
220     ao2_find(c, arg, flags)
221         returns zero or more element matching a given criteria
222         (specified as arg). Flags indicate how many results we
223         want (only one or all matching entries), and whether we
224         should unlink the object from the container.
225
226     ao2_callback(c, flags, fn, arg)
227         apply fn(obj, arg) to all objects in the container.
228         Similar to find. fn() can tell when to stop, and
229         do anything with the object including unlinking it.
230         Note that the entire operation is run with the container
231         locked, so noone else can change its content while we work on it.
232         However, we pay this with the fact that doing
233         anything blocking in the callback keeps the container
234         blocked.
235         The mechanism is very flexible because the callback function fn()
236         can do basically anything e.g. counting, deleting records, etc.
237         possibly using arg to store the results.
238    
239     iterate on a container
240         this is done with the following sequence
241
242             struct ao2_container *c = ... // our container
243             struct ao2_iterator i;
244             void *o;
245
246             i = ao2_iterator_init(c, flags);
247      
248             while ( (o = ao2_iterator_next(&i)) ) {
249                 ... do something on o ...
250                 ao2_ref(o, -1);
251             }
252
253         The difference with the callback is that the control
254         on how to iterate is left to us.
255
256     ao2_ref(c, -1)
257         dropping a reference to a container destroys it, very simple!
258  
259 Containers are astobj2 object themselves, and this is why their
260 implementation is simple too.
261
262  */
263
264 /*!
265  * We can perform different operation on an object. We do this
266  * according the following flags.
267  */
268 enum search_flags {
269         /*! unlink the object found */
270         OBJ_UNLINK       = (1 << 0),
271         /*! on match, don't return the object or increase its reference count. */
272         OBJ_NODATA       = (1 << 1),
273         /*! don't stop at the first match 
274          *  \note This is not fully implemented. */
275         OBJ_MULTIPLE = (1 << 2),
276         /*! obj is an object of the same type as the one being searched for.
277          *  This implies that it can be passed to the object's hash function
278          *  for optimized searching. */
279         OBJ_POINTER      = (1 << 3),
280 };
281
282 /*!
283  * Type of a generic function to generate a hash value from an object.
284  *
285  */
286 typedef int (*ao2_hash_fn)(const void *obj, const int flags);
287
288 /*!
289  * valid callback results:
290  * We return a combination of
291  * CMP_MATCH when the object matches the request,
292  * and CMP_STOP when we should not continue the search further.
293  */
294 enum _cb_results {
295         CMP_MATCH       = 0x1,
296         CMP_STOP        = 0x2,
297 };
298
299 /*!
300  * generic function to compare objects.
301  * This, as other callbacks, should return a combination of
302  * _cb_results as described above.
303  *
304  * \param o     object from container
305  * \param arg   search parameters (directly from ao2_find)
306  * \param flags passed directly from ao2_find
307  *      XXX explain.
308  */
309
310 /*!
311  * Type of a generic callback function
312  * \param obj  pointer to the (user-defined part) of an object.
313  * \param arg callback argument from ao2_callback()
314  * \param flags flags from ao2_callback()
315  * The return values are the same as a compare function.
316  * In fact, they are the same thing.
317  */
318 typedef int (*ao2_callback_fn)(void *obj, void *arg, int flags);
319
320 /*!
321  * Here start declarations of containers.
322  */
323 struct ao2_container;
324
325 /*!
326  * Allocate and initialize a container 
327  * with the desired number of buckets.
328  * 
329  * We allocate space for a struct astobj_container, struct container
330  * and the buckets[] array.
331  *
332  * \param n_buckets Number of buckets for hash
333  * \param hash_fn Pointer to a function computing a hash value.
334  * \param cmp_fn Pointer to a function comparating key-value 
335  *                      with a string. (can be NULL)
336  * \return A pointer to a struct container.
337  *
338  * destructor is set implicitly.
339  */
340 struct ao2_container *ao2_container_alloc(const uint n_buckets,
341                 ao2_hash_fn hash_fn, ao2_callback_fn cmp_fn);
342
343 /*!
344  * Returns the number of elements in a container.
345  */
346 int ao2_container_count(struct ao2_container *c);
347
348 /*
349  * Here we have functions to manage objects.
350  *
351  * We can use the functions below on any kind of 
352  * object defined by the user.
353  */
354 /*!
355  * Add an object to a container.
356  *
357  * \param c the container to operate on.
358  * \param newobj the object to be added.
359  * \return NULL on errors, other values on success.
360  *
361  * This function insert an object in a container according its key.
362  *
363  * \note Remember to set the key before calling this function.
364  */
365 void *ao2_link(struct ao2_container *c, void *newobj);
366 void *ao2_unlink(struct ao2_container *c, void *newobj);
367
368 /*! \brief Used as return value if the flag OBJ_MULTIPLE is set */
369 struct ao2_list {
370         struct ao2_list *next;
371         void *obj;      /* pointer to the user portion of the object */
372 };
373
374 /*!
375  * ao2_callback() and astob2_find() are the same thing with only one difference:
376  * the latter uses as a callback the function passed as my_cmp_f() at
377  * the time of the creation of the container.
378  * 
379  * \param c A pointer to the container to operate on.
380  * \param arg passed to the callback.
381  * \param flags A set of flags specifying the operation to perform,
382         partially used by the container code, but also passed to
383         the callback.
384  * \return      A pointer to the object found/marked, 
385  *              a pointer to a list of objects matching comparison function,
386  *              NULL if not found.
387  * If the function returns any objects, their refcount is incremented,
388  * and the caller is in charge of decrementing them once done.
389  * Also, in case of multiple values returned, the list used
390  * to store the objects must be freed by the caller.
391  *
392  * This function searches through a container and performs operations
393  * on objects according on flags passed.
394  * XXX describe better
395  * The comparison is done calling the compare function set implicitly. 
396  * The p pointer can be a pointer to an object or to a key, 
397  * we can say this looking at flags value.
398  * If p points to an object we will search for the object pointed
399  * by this value, otherwise we serch for a key value.
400  * If the key is not uniq we only find the first matching valued.
401  * If we use the OBJ_MARK flags, we mark all the objects matching 
402  * the condition.
403  *
404  * The use of flags argument is the follow:
405  *
406  *      OBJ_UNLINK              unlinks the object found
407  *      OBJ_NODATA              on match, do return an object
408  *                              Callbacks use OBJ_NODATA as a default
409  *                              functions such as find() do
410  *      OBJ_MULTIPLE            return multiple matches
411  *                              Default for _find() is no.
412  *                              to a key (not yet supported)
413  *      OBJ_POINTER             the pointer is an object pointer
414  *
415  * In case we return a list, the callee must take care to destroy 
416  * that list when no longer used.
417  *
418  * \note When the returned object is no longer in use, ao2_ref() should
419  * be used to free the additional reference possibly created by this function.
420  */
421 /* XXX order of arguments to find */
422 void *ao2_find(struct ao2_container *c, void *arg, enum search_flags flags);
423 void *ao2_callback(struct ao2_container *c,
424         enum search_flags flags,
425         ao2_callback_fn cb_fn, void *arg);
426
427 int ao2_match_by_addr(void *user_data, void *arg, int flags);
428 /*!
429  *
430  *
431  * When we need to walk through a container, we use
432  * ao2_iterator to keep track of the current position.
433  * 
434  * Because the navigation is typically done without holding the
435  * lock on the container across the loop,
436  * objects can be inserted or deleted or moved
437  * while we work. As a consequence, there is no guarantee that
438  * the we manage to touch all the elements on the list, or it
439  * is possible that we touch the same object multiple times.
440  * However, within the current hash table container, the following is true:
441  *  - It is not possible to miss an object in the container while iterating
442  *    unless it gets added after the iteration begins and is added to a bucket
443  *    that is before the one the current object is in.  In this case, even if
444  *    you locked the container around the entire iteration loop, you still would
445  *    not see this object, because it would still be waiting on the container
446  *    lock so that it can be added.
447  *  - It would be extremely rare to see an object twice.  The only way this can
448  *    happen is if an object got unlinked from the container and added again 
449  *    during the same iteration.  Furthermore, when the object gets added back,
450  *    it has to be in the current or later bucket for it to be seen again.
451  *
452  * An iterator must be first initialized with ao2_iterator_init(),
453  * then we can use o = ao2_iterator_next() to move from one
454  * element to the next. Remember that the object returned by
455  * ao2_iterator_next() has its refcount incremented,
456  * and the reference must be explicitly released when done with it.
457  *
458  * Example:
459  *
460  *  \code
461  *
462  *  struct ao2_container *c = ... // the container we want to iterate on
463  *  struct ao2_iterator i;
464  *  struct my_obj *o;
465  *
466  *  i = ao2_iterator_init(c, flags);
467  *
468  *  while ( (o = ao2_iterator_next(&i)) ) {
469  *     ... do something on o ...
470  *     ao2_ref(o, -1);
471  *  }
472  *
473  *  \endcode
474  *
475  */
476
477 /*!
478  * You are not supposed to know the internals of an iterator!
479  * We would like the iterator to be opaque, unfortunately
480  * its size needs to be known if we want to store it around
481  * without too much trouble.
482  * Anyways...
483  * The iterator has a pointer to the container, and a flags
484  * field specifying various things e.g. whether the container
485  * should be locked or not while navigating on it.
486  * The iterator "points" to the current object, which is identified
487  * by three values:
488  * - a bucket number;
489  * - the object_id, which is also the container version number
490  *   when the object was inserted. This identifies the object
491  *   univoquely, however reaching the desired object requires
492  *   scanning a list.
493  * - a pointer, and a container version when we saved the pointer.
494  *   If the container has not changed its version number, then we
495  *   can safely follow the pointer to reach the object in constant time.
496  * Details are in the implementation of ao2_iterator_next()
497  * A freshly-initialized iterator has bucket=0, version = 0.
498  */
499
500 struct ao2_iterator {
501         /*! the container */
502         struct ao2_container *c;
503         /*! operation flags */
504         int flags;
505 #define F_AO2I_DONTLOCK 1       /*!< don't lock when iterating */
506         /*! current bucket */
507         int bucket;
508         /*! container version */
509         uint c_version;
510         /*! pointer to the current object */
511         void *obj;
512         /*! container version when the object was created */
513         uint version;
514 };
515
516 struct ao2_iterator ao2_iterator_init(struct ao2_container *c, int flags);
517
518 void *ao2_iterator_next(struct ao2_iterator *a);
519
520 #endif /* _ASTERISK_ASTOBJ2_H */